Indiana Genetic Animal Models Core

Project: Research project

Description

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant):
The long-term objective of this research is to investigate neuroadaptations
within the extended amygdala and its interconnections following excessive
ethanol consumption in rats. One series of experiments will ensure the
quality control and availabity of rats taken through the excessive ethanol
drinking animal model. Towards this end, high-alcohol-consuming P and HAD
(both replicate lines) rats will be taken through an ethanol drinking protocol
involving repeated cycles of exposure to multiple ethanol concentrations
followed by a period of deprivation. A second series of experiments will
further characterize and refine the ethanol drinking protocol by evaluating
the effects of altering the length of initial and subsequent 1) ethanol
exposures and 2) deprivations and changing the available ethanol
concentrations. A third series of experiments will examine the influence this
experimental paradigm of cycles of ethanol availability and deprivation has in
the drinking pattern of low-alcohol-consuming (e.g., NP, LAD-1, LAD-2 and
Wistar) rats. The ethanol drinking protocol results in very high levels of
ethanol intake in P and HAD rats (up to 16g/kg/day on the reinstatement of
multiple concentrations of ethanol after three cycles of exposure and
deprivation), suggesting that the reinforcing properties of ethanol may have
been enhanced. The main hypothesis to be tested is that experience with
excessive ethanol drinking results in neuroadaptive alterations in the
extended amygdala and its interconnections. The rat lines that have been
genetically selected for high alcohol drinking at Indiana University (i.e., P,
HAD-1 and HAD-2) have been known to exhibit "loss of control" drinking when
exposed to the ethanol drinking protocol proposed in this program. The
results of this proposal will provide valuable information toward
understanding the neural circuitry underlying excessive alcohol drinking and
relapse of alcohol drinking. Such information would be important for
developing pharmacotherapies for the treatment of alcoholism and alcohol
abuse.
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date9/27/018/31/16

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health: $263,791.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $267,907.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $277,925.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $99,990.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $267,796.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $288,901.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $287,455.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $354,411.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $275,070.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $347,808.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $283,321.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $346,001.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $378,589.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $381,788.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $270,954.00

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Animal Models
Drinking
Binge Drinking
Ethanol
Genetic Models
Alcoholism
Alcohol Drinking
Amygdala
Maintenance
Brain
Alcohols
Genes
Gene Expression
Research
Drinking Behavior
Inhalation
Research Personnel
Pharmacology
Ligands

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)