COMPARISON OF SENSORY AIDS IN DEAF CHILDREN

  • Miyamoto, Richard (PI)
  • Griffith, Andrew J. (PI)
  • Brewer, Carmen Crowell (PI)
  • Donaldson, Gail S. (PI)

Project: Research project

Description

The long-term objective of this research is to gain a better understanding
of the ability of deaf children to use specific types of sensory aids to
acquire communication skills. The acquisition of these skills typically
occurs slowly and imperfectly in deaf children. When children are totally
deaf and cannot benefit from conventional hearing aids, access to the
acoustic speech signal must be provided via a sensory aid that does not
require cochlear function. Currently, two types of sensory aids are being
used with these children: cochlear implants (CI) and vibrotactile aids
(VT). The proposed research is designed to quantitate performance and to
address fundamental issues related to device candidacy and efficacy. It is hypothesized that: (1) Multichannel CI and multichannel VT are superior to devices with a
restricted number of channels in improving the speech perception abilities
of totally deaf children who receive no benefit from conventional
amplification. (2) The rate of acquisition of speech perception skills is faster with
multichannel CI and VT than with a restricted number of channels. A battery
of speech perception and language measures will be administered at 6 month
intervals to validate these hypotheses. (3) Deaf children who have residual hearing demonstrate superior speech
perception abilities with conventional hearing aids than totally deaf
children who use a CI or VT. To test this hypothesis, hearing aid subjects
will be tested longitudinally on the same measures used to assess the
speech perception abilities of the children with CI or VT. (4) Deaf children who have residual hearing demonstrate superior speech
perception skills when they have access to multimodal sensory information
(auditory, tactual and visual) than when information is perceived via any
of the modalities alone. The test measures used will be the same as above
but the test conditions will be different. (5) Acoustic stimulation enhances visual attention and perception which
promotes the development of cognitive and linguistic learning in deaf
children who use CI and VT.
StatusActive
Effective start/end date4/1/90 → …

Funding

  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $433,567.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $558,627.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $566,638.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $567,716.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $541,221.00
  • National Institutes of Health
  • National Institutes of Health: $601,933.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $584,400.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $512,571.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $457,409.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $465,661.00
  • National Institutes of Health: $323,992.00

Fingerprint

Sensory Aids
Cochlear Implants
Speech Perception
Aptitude
Hearing Aids
Hearing Loss
Language
Individuality
Research
Competitive Bidding
Hearing
Language Development
Linguistics
Learning
Acoustic Stimulation

ASJC

  • Medicine(all)
  • Neuroscience(all)