A Brief Critique of the TATES Procedure

Fazil Aliev, Jessica E. Salvatore, Arpana Agrawal, Laura Almasy, Grace Chan, Howard Edenberg, Victor Hesselbrock, Samuel Kuperman, Jacquelyn Meyers, Danielle M. Dick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Trait-based test that uses the Extended Simes procedure (TATES) was developed as a method for conducting multivariate GWAS for correlated phenotypes whose underlying genetic architecture is complex. In this paper, we provide a brief methodological critique of the TATES method using simulated examples and a mathematical proof. Our simulated examples using correlated phenotypes show that the Type I error rate is higher than expected, and that more TATES p values fall outside of the confidence interval relative to expectation. Thus the method may result in systematic inflation when used with correlated phenotypes. In a mathematical proof we further demonstrate that the distribution of TATES p values deviates from expectation in a manner indicative of inflation. Our findings indicate the need for caution when using TATES for multivariate GWAS of correlated phenotypes.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages155-167
Number of pages13
JournalBehavior Genetics
Volume48
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

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phenotype
inflation
Phenotype
Genome-Wide Association Study
Economic Inflation
confidence interval
methodology
method
testing
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Complex traits
  • Multivariate GWAS
  • TATES

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Aliev, F., Salvatore, J. E., Agrawal, A., Almasy, L., Chan, G., Edenberg, H., ... Dick, D. M. (2018). A Brief Critique of the TATES Procedure. Behavior Genetics, 48(2), 155-167. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10519-018-9890-6

A Brief Critique of the TATES Procedure. / Aliev, Fazil; Salvatore, Jessica E.; Agrawal, Arpana; Almasy, Laura; Chan, Grace; Edenberg, Howard; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kuperman, Samuel; Meyers, Jacquelyn; Dick, Danielle M.

In: Behavior Genetics, Vol. 48, No. 2, 01.03.2018, p. 155-167.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Aliev, F, Salvatore, JE, Agrawal, A, Almasy, L, Chan, G, Edenberg, H, Hesselbrock, V, Kuperman, S, Meyers, J & Dick, DM 2018, 'A Brief Critique of the TATES Procedure' Behavior Genetics, vol. 48, no. 2, pp. 155-167. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10519-018-9890-6
Aliev F, Salvatore JE, Agrawal A, Almasy L, Chan G, Edenberg H et al. A Brief Critique of the TATES Procedure. Behavior Genetics. 2018 Mar 1;48(2):155-167. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10519-018-9890-6
Aliev, Fazil ; Salvatore, Jessica E. ; Agrawal, Arpana ; Almasy, Laura ; Chan, Grace ; Edenberg, Howard ; Hesselbrock, Victor ; Kuperman, Samuel ; Meyers, Jacquelyn ; Dick, Danielle M. / A Brief Critique of the TATES Procedure. In: Behavior Genetics. 2018 ; Vol. 48, No. 2. pp. 155-167.
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