A case of extensive hyperostosis frontalis interna in an 87-year-old female human cadaver

Ernest F. Talarico, Andrew D. Prather, Kevin D. Hardt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hyperostosis frontalis interna (HFI) is a condition that involves thickening of the inner surface of the frontal bone with sparing of the midline. Little is known about the etiology and clinical presentation of HFI. We report unusual findings in a woman with extensive Type D hyperostosis of the frontal bone and a large hyperostotic nodule in the parietal bone with impingement on the precentral gyrus, distinguishing this from the common form of HFI. The scalp was dissected from the cranial vault, and the calvaria and brain were removed and digitally imaged. Bone specimens were embedded in methyl methacrylate plastic, sectioned, and stained using the Von Kossa Method with MacNeal's tetrachrome. Medical records were reviewed, and additional history was obtained through interviews with the donor's family. The calvaria had extensive, bilateral thickening of the frontal bone with irregular topography and clearly demarcated borders. The dura was adherent to all hyperostotic regions. A 3.5-cm nodule was visible on the inner table of the left parietal bone. The dura and cerebrum showed compression in this region, but it was unclear if this resulted in clinical ramifications. Microscopic analysis revealed a larger proportion of cancellous bone was present in regions of macroscopic hyperostosis. Quantitative analysis of sections through areas of gross hyperostosis demonstrated a lower proportion of lamellar bone than in the control. The patient exhibited symptoms that have been correlated to HFI in previous studies. We suggest that the HFI disease process was responsible for the manifestation of these symptoms in this patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-268
Number of pages10
JournalClinical Anatomy
Volume21
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 18 2008

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Keywords

  • Calvaria
  • Endocranium
  • Hyperostosis
  • Skull

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy

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