A case report of cor pulmonale in a woman without exposure to tobacco smoke: An example of the risks of indoor wood burning

Alexander R. Opotowsky, Rajesh Vedanthan, Joseph Mamlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present the case of a 67-year-old woman with chronic cor pulmonale. She never smoked tobacco and had no other risk factors for pulmonary disease. In developed nations, chronic obstructive lung disease and cor pulmonale are overwhelmingly associated with tobacco use. However, indoor air pollution, most commonly due to burning of solid biomass fuel such as wood, can cause similar clinical syndromes. At our teaching hospital, there is an epidemic of chronic cor pulmonale among nonsmoking women. We attribute this sex predilection to women's greater exposure to wood smoke. Physicians must be cognizant of its risks and counsel patients on prevention strategies such as improved ventilation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number22
JournalMedGenMed Medscape General Medicine
Volume10
Issue number1
StatePublished - 2008

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Pulmonary Heart Disease
Smoke
Tobacco
Indoor Air Pollution
Tobacco Use
Developed Countries
Teaching Hospitals
Biomass
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Lung Diseases
Ventilation
Physicians

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A case report of cor pulmonale in a woman without exposure to tobacco smoke : An example of the risks of indoor wood burning. / Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Vedanthan, Rajesh; Mamlin, Joseph.

In: MedGenMed Medscape General Medicine, Vol. 10, No. 1, 22, 2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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