A comparison of a lecture and computer program to teach fundamentals of the Draw-a-Person test

Aaron Carroll, M. William Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although computer-assisted education has been used to augment education in many areas, there are few studies of programs designed to replace lectures in a medical curriculum. Objective: To test whether a thoughtfully designed computer program can replace a standard lecture in a pediatrics curriculum while teaching the subject matter equally well. Methods: A computer program was developed to teach the Draw-a-Person developmental test using the multimedia-authoring tool Director. One of us (A.E.C.) tested and modified the program several times during its creation after submitting it to several objective evaluators. Thirty-nine students taking the clinical pediatrics rotation were chosen by month to interact with the program or attend the lecture. All students then scored 3 drawings and assigned them a developmental age according to the Draw-a-Person test rules. Students assigned to the computer program also completed a questionnaire evaluating the program in several subjective areas. A t test for 2 samples assuming equal variance was used to analyze the test results. Results: Students receiving the lecture (control group) scored the 3 drawings as 5.43 years (age range, 4.5-8 years), 9.08 years (age range, 7-12 years), and 3.5 years (age range, 2-5 years), respectively. Those using the computer program (study group) scored the 3 drawings as 5.91 years (age range, 5-7 years), 7.68 years (age range, 7-8 years), and 4.34 years (age range, 3-5 years), respectively. The correct answers for the ages were 6, 7.75, and 4.25 years, respectively. A t test for 2 samples assuming equal variance showed that students using the computer program performed better on all 3 drawings (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-140
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume156
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Software
Students
Curriculum
Pediatrics
Education
Multimedia
Teaching
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

A comparison of a lecture and computer program to teach fundamentals of the Draw-a-Person test. / Carroll, Aaron; Schwartz, M. William.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 156, No. 2, 2002, p. 137-140.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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