A conceptual model of irritability following traumatic brain injury: A qualitative, participatory research study

Flora Hammond, Christine Davis, James R. Cook, Peggy Philbrick, Mark A. Hirsch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Individuals with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) may have chronic problems with irritability, which can negatively affect their lives. Objectives: (1) To describe the experience (thoughts and feelings) of irritability from the perspectives of multiple people living with or affected by the problem, and (2) to develop a conceptual model of irritability. Design: Qualitative, participatory research. Participants: Forty-four stakeholders (individuals with a history of TBI, family members, community professionals, healthcare providers, and researchers) divided into 5 focus groups. Procedures: Each group met 10 times to discuss the experience of irritability following TBI. Data were coded using grounded theory to develop themes, metacodes, and theories. Measures: Not applicable. Results: A conceptual model emerged in which irritability has 5 dimensions: affective (related to moods and feelings); behavioral (especially in areas of self-regulation, impulse control, and time management); cognitive-perceptual (self-talk and ways of seeing the world); relational issues (interpersonal and family dynamics); and environmental (including environmental stimuli, change, disruptions in routine, and cultural expectations). Conclusions: This multidimensional model provides a framework for assessment, treatment, and future research aimed at better understanding irritability, as well as the development of assessment tools and treatment interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E1-E11
JournalJournal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 4 2016

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Qualitative Research
Emotions
Time Management
Community Health Services
Family Relations
Focus Groups
Health Personnel
Research Personnel
Therapeutics
Traumatic Brain Injury

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Behavior
  • Brain injury
  • Irritability
  • Participatory research
  • Qualitative research
  • Translational research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

A conceptual model of irritability following traumatic brain injury : A qualitative, participatory research study. / Hammond, Flora; Davis, Christine; Cook, James R.; Philbrick, Peggy; Hirsch, Mark A.

In: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, Vol. 31, No. 2, 04.03.2016, p. E1-E11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hammond, Flora ; Davis, Christine ; Cook, James R. ; Philbrick, Peggy ; Hirsch, Mark A. / A conceptual model of irritability following traumatic brain injury : A qualitative, participatory research study. In: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. E1-E11.
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