A continuous quality improvement curriculum for residents

Addressing core competency, improving systems

Alexander M. Djuricich, Mary Ciccarelli, Nancy Swigonski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To describe the development, implementation, and evaluation of a residency continuous quality improvement (CQI) curriculum. Method. Forty-four medicine and pediatrics residents participated in a CQI curriculum. Resident-designed projects were scored for CQI construct skills using a grading tool. Pre- and post-tests evaluated knowledge, perceived knowledge, interest, and self-efficacy. Results. Differences between pre- and post-test perceived knowledge and self-efficacy were highly significant (p <.001). The mean project score was 81.7% (SD 8.3%). Higher knowledge was associated with higher ratings of self-efficacy. There was no correlation of measured knowledge with project score or interest. Conclusions. Resident education and learning in CQI served to produce innovative and creative improvement projects that demonstrated individual residents' competency in practice-based learning and improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume79
Issue number10 SUPPL.
StatePublished - Oct 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Quality Improvement
Curriculum
Self Efficacy
resident
self-efficacy
curriculum
Learning
grading
Internship and Residency
learning
rating
Medicine
medicine
Pediatrics
Education
evaluation
knowledge
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

Cite this

A continuous quality improvement curriculum for residents : Addressing core competency, improving systems. / Djuricich, Alexander M.; Ciccarelli, Mary; Swigonski, Nancy.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 79, No. 10 SUPPL., 10.2004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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