A cross-sectional survey of stressors for postpartum women during wartime in a military medical facility

David Haas, Lisa A. Pazdernik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine whether having a partner deployed during wartime increased the stress levels in pregnant women and altered the attitudes toward pregnancy or changed birth outcomes. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of all postpartum women at Naval Hospital Camp Lejeune. The anonymous survey was administered from May to July 2003. Results: Ninety-five surveys were collected. Fewer patients reported that their partner was deployed (41.1%) than not deployed (58.9%). Women with deployed partners gave birth to larger babies (3526.5 g vs. 3248.7 g, p = 0.016). No difference was seen in the gestational age at delivery, percentage with vaginal delivery, average number of children at home, self-reported stress, or reported weight gain during pregnancy. Women with partners deployed more often reported changed eating habits (56.4% vs. 8.0%, p <0.001). Those with a deployed partner more often reported that media coverage impacted their stress level (p = 0.003). Conclusions: Pregnant women with deployed partners gave birth to larger babies. They also more frequently report a change in eating habits and that media coverage impacted their stress level.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1020-1023
Number of pages4
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume171
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Military Facilities
Postpartum Period
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parturition
Feeding Behavior
Pregnant Women
Pregnancy
Gestational Age
Weight Gain
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

A cross-sectional survey of stressors for postpartum women during wartime in a military medical facility. / Haas, David; Pazdernik, Lisa A.

In: Military Medicine, Vol. 171, No. 10, 10.2006, p. 1020-1023.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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