A genome-wide screen for genes influencing conduct disorder

D. M. Dick, T. K. Li, H. J. Edenberg, V. Hesselbrock, J. Kramer, S. Kuperman, B. Porjesz, K. Bucholz, A. Goate, J. Nurnberger, T. Foroud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While behavioral genetic studies have suggested that childhood conduct disorder is under genetic influence, studies aimed at gene identification are lacking. This study represents the first genome-wide linkage analysis directed toward identifying genes contributing to conduct disorder. Genome screens of retrospectively reported childhood conduct disorder and conduct disorder symptomatology were carried out in the genetically informative adult sample collected as part of the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). The results suggest that regions on chromosomes 19 and 2 may contain genes conferring risk to conduct disorder. Interestingly, the same region on chromosome 2 has also been linked to alcohol dependence in this sample. Childhood conduct disorder is known to be associated with the susceptibility for future alcohol problems. Taken together, these findings suggest that some of the genes contributing to alcohol dependence in adulthood may also contribute to conduct disorder in childhood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-86
Number of pages6
JournalMolecular Psychiatry
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 17 2004

Fingerprint

Conduct Disorder
Genome
Genes
Alcoholism
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2
Behavioral Genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 19
Alcohols

Keywords

  • Alcohol dependence
  • Conduct disorder
  • Genetics
  • Linkage analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A genome-wide screen for genes influencing conduct disorder. / Dick, D. M.; Li, T. K.; Edenberg, H. J.; Hesselbrock, V.; Kramer, J.; Kuperman, S.; Porjesz, B.; Bucholz, K.; Goate, A.; Nurnberger, J.; Foroud, T.

In: Molecular Psychiatry, Vol. 9, No. 1, 17.02.2004, p. 81-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dick, DM, Li, TK, Edenberg, HJ, Hesselbrock, V, Kramer, J, Kuperman, S, Porjesz, B, Bucholz, K, Goate, A, Nurnberger, J & Foroud, T 2004, 'A genome-wide screen for genes influencing conduct disorder', Molecular Psychiatry, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 81-86. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.mp.4001368
Dick DM, Li TK, Edenberg HJ, Hesselbrock V, Kramer J, Kuperman S et al. A genome-wide screen for genes influencing conduct disorder. Molecular Psychiatry. 2004 Feb 17;9(1):81-86. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.mp.4001368
Dick, D. M. ; Li, T. K. ; Edenberg, H. J. ; Hesselbrock, V. ; Kramer, J. ; Kuperman, S. ; Porjesz, B. ; Bucholz, K. ; Goate, A. ; Nurnberger, J. ; Foroud, T. / A genome-wide screen for genes influencing conduct disorder. In: Molecular Psychiatry. 2004 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 81-86.
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