A health care transition curriculum for primary care residents

Identifying goals and objectives

Alice A. Kuo, Mary Ciccarelli, Niraj Sharma, Debra S. Lotstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The transition from pediatric to adult health care is a vulnerable period for youth with special health care needs. Although successful transitions are recognized as critical for improving adult outcomes and reducing health care utilization and cost, an educational gap in health care transitions for physicians persists. Our aim with this project was to develop a national health care transition residency curriculum for primary care physicians, using an expert-based, consensus-building process. METHODS: Medical professionals with expertise in health care transition were recruited to participate in a survey to assist in the development of a health care transition curriculum for primary care physicians. By using a modified Delphi process, curricular goals and objectives were drafted, and participants rated the importance of each objective, feasibility of developing activities for objectives, and appropriateness of objectives for specified learners. Mean and SDs for each response and percent rating for the appropriateness of each objective were calculated. RESULTS: Fifty-six of 246 possible respondents participated in round 1 of ratings and 36 (64%) participated in the second round. Five goals with 32 associated objectives were identified. Twenty-five of the 32 objectives (78%) were rated as being appropriate for "proficient" learners, with 7 objectives rated as "expert." Three objectives were added to map onto the Got Transition guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: The identified goals and objectives provide the foundation and structure for future curriculum development, facilitating the sharing of curricular activities and evaluation tools across programs by faculty with a range of expertise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S346-S354
JournalPediatrics
Volume141
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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Patient Transfer
Curriculum
Primary Health Care
Primary Care Physicians
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Delivery of Health Care
Internship and Residency
Health Care Costs
Guidelines
Pediatrics
Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

A health care transition curriculum for primary care residents : Identifying goals and objectives. / Kuo, Alice A.; Ciccarelli, Mary; Sharma, Niraj; Lotstein, Debra S.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 141, 01.04.2018, p. S346-S354.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kuo, Alice A. ; Ciccarelli, Mary ; Sharma, Niraj ; Lotstein, Debra S. / A health care transition curriculum for primary care residents : Identifying goals and objectives. In: Pediatrics. 2018 ; Vol. 141. pp. S346-S354.
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