A Multi-Institutional Longitudinal Faculty Development Program in Humanism Supports the Professional Development of Faculty Teachers

William T. Branch, Richard Frankel, Janet P. Hafler, Amy B. Weil, Mary Ann C. Gilligan, Debra Litzelman, Margaret Plews-Ogan, Elizabeth A. Rider, Lars G. Osterberg, Dana Dunne, Natalie B. May, Arthur R. Derse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors describe the first 11 academic years (2005-2006 through 2016-2017) of a longitudinal, small-group faculty development program for strengthening humanistic teaching and role modeling at 30 U.S. and Canadian medical schools that continues today. During the yearlong program, small groups of participating faculty met twice monthly with a local facilitator for exercises in humanistic teaching, role modeling, and related topics that combined narrative reflection with skills training using experiential learning techniques. The program focused on the professional development of its participants. Thirty schools participated; 993 faculty, including some residents, completed the program. In evaluations, participating faculty at 13 of the schools scored significantly more positively as rated by learners on all dimensions of medical humanism than did matched controls. Qualitative analyses from several cohorts suggest many participants had progressed to more advanced stages of professional identity formation after completing the program. Strong engagement and attendance by faculty participants as well as the multimodal evaluation suggest that the program may serve as a model for others. Recently, most schools adopting the program have offered the curriculum annually to two or more groups of faculty participants to create sufficient numbers of trained faculty to positively influence humanistic teaching at the institution. The authors discuss the program's learning theory, outline its curriculum, reflect on the program's accomplishments and plans for the future, and state how faculty trained in such programs could lead institutional initiatives and foster positive change in humanistic professional development at all levels of medical education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1680-1686
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume92
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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humanism
teacher
school
small group
Teaching
curriculum
identity formation
learning theory
evaluation
resident
narrative

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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A Multi-Institutional Longitudinal Faculty Development Program in Humanism Supports the Professional Development of Faculty Teachers. / Branch, William T.; Frankel, Richard; Hafler, Janet P.; Weil, Amy B.; Gilligan, Mary Ann C.; Litzelman, Debra; Plews-Ogan, Margaret; Rider, Elizabeth A.; Osterberg, Lars G.; Dunne, Dana; May, Natalie B.; Derse, Arthur R.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 92, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 1680-1686.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Branch, WT, Frankel, R, Hafler, JP, Weil, AB, Gilligan, MAC, Litzelman, D, Plews-Ogan, M, Rider, EA, Osterberg, LG, Dunne, D, May, NB & Derse, AR 2017, 'A Multi-Institutional Longitudinal Faculty Development Program in Humanism Supports the Professional Development of Faculty Teachers', Academic Medicine, vol. 92, no. 12, pp. 1680-1686. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0000000000001940
Branch, William T. ; Frankel, Richard ; Hafler, Janet P. ; Weil, Amy B. ; Gilligan, Mary Ann C. ; Litzelman, Debra ; Plews-Ogan, Margaret ; Rider, Elizabeth A. ; Osterberg, Lars G. ; Dunne, Dana ; May, Natalie B. ; Derse, Arthur R. / A Multi-Institutional Longitudinal Faculty Development Program in Humanism Supports the Professional Development of Faculty Teachers. In: Academic Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 92, No. 12. pp. 1680-1686.
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