A National Survey Assessing SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination Intentions: Implications for Future Public Health Communication Efforts

Katharine J. Head, Monica L. Kasting, Lynne A. Sturm, Jane A. Hartsock, Gregory D. Zimet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

With SARS-CoV-2 vaccines under development, research is needed to assess intention to vaccinate. We conducted a survey (N = 3,159) with U.S. adults in May 2020 assessing SARS-CoV-2 vaccine intentions, intentions with a provider recommendation, and sociodemographic and psychosocial variables. Participants had high SARS-CoV-2 vaccine intentions (M = 5.23/7-point scale), which increased significantly with a provider recommendation (M = 5.47). Hierarchical linear regression showed that less education and working in health care were associated with lower intent, and liberal political views, altruism, and COVID-19-related health beliefs were associated with higher intent. This work can inform interventions to increase vaccine uptake, ultimately reducing COVID-19-related morbidity and mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalScience Communication
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • perceived threat
  • provider recommendation
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • vaccination intentions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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