A personal experience in comparing three nonoperative techniques for treating internal hemorrhoids

S. S. Zinberg, D. H. Stern, D. S. Furman, Joel Wittles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infrared photocoagulation therapy was used on a total of 302 patients. Approximately 20% of the patients experienced minor bleeding; however, two required surgery, and 30% of the patients experienced discomfort during a 14-day period following the procedure. Good results were obtained in patients with first- and second-degree hemorrhoids. Heater probe coagulation therapy was conducted in a total of 264 patients. Good results were achieved in 90% of patients with first- and second-degree hemorrhoids, minor pain and bleeding occurred in approximately 10% of these patients, and one patient with third-degree hemorrhoids who was treated with this technique failed to respond and required surgery. Ultroid d.c. current therapy was utilized in 192 patients, and follow-up results were good in 95% of these cases. Minor bleeding occurred in four patients. It is concluded that all three techniques, performed on an outpatient basis with little or no sedation, are effective modalities for first- and second-degree hemorrhoids, but that Ultroid d.c. current therapy is associated with less discomfort and fewer complications and that Ultroid therapy may yield good results in some patients with third- or even fourth-degree hemorrhoids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)488-492
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume84
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Hemorrhoids
Hemorrhage
Therapeutics
Light Coagulation
Outpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

A personal experience in comparing three nonoperative techniques for treating internal hemorrhoids. / Zinberg, S. S.; Stern, D. H.; Furman, D. S.; Wittles, Joel.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 84, No. 5, 1989, p. 488-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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