A phase II trial of vinblastine plus dipyridamole in advanced renal cell carcinoma

A hoosier oncology group study

B. R. Murphy, S. M. Rynard, K. L. Pennington, W. Grosh, Patrick Loehrer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One potential explanation for why renal cell carcinoma is usually poorly responsive to chemotherapy is intrinsic multidrug resistance. Dipyridamole (DP) is one of several agents known to bind to P-glycoprotein and potentially reverse multidrug resistance in vitro, and dosages needed to obtain appropriate levels in vivo appear to be well tolerated. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the combination of vinblastine (VLB) and DP in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma and no prior chemotherapy. From August 1989 through December 1989, 15 patients with inoperable recurrent or metastatic renal cell carcinoma were treated with VLB 0.2 mg/kg (i.v. slow push) and concurrently received DP 75 mg p.o. q.i.d. starting 48 hours before and continuing 48 hours after VLB administration. Courses were repeated every 3 weeks for a maximum of 8 weeks, or until disease progression or undue toxicities ensued. The predominant toxicities seen were mild neurotoxicity and leukopenia. Only 1 patient had grade IV leukopenia, and no lethal toxicities occurred. No objective responses were seen: 2 patients had stable disease for 29 and 30+ months. The median survival was 9 months (range: 2.5- 30+). We conclude that at the dose and schedule used in this study, the combination of VLB and DP may be administered with acceptable toxicities, but is ineffective in the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-13
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
Volume17
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1994

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Dipyridamole
Vinblastine
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Leukopenia
Multiple Drug Resistance
Drug Therapy
P-Glycoprotein
Disease Progression
Appointments and Schedules
Survival
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

A phase II trial of vinblastine plus dipyridamole in advanced renal cell carcinoma : A hoosier oncology group study. / Murphy, B. R.; Rynard, S. M.; Pennington, K. L.; Grosh, W.; Loehrer, Patrick.

In: American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials, Vol. 17, No. 1, 1994, p. 10-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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