A pilot study: a teaching electronic medical record for educating and assessing residents in the care of patients

Joshua Smith, William Carlos, Cynthia S. Johnson, Blaine Takesue, Debra Litzelman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: We tested a novel, web-based teaching electronic medical record to teach and assess residents’ ability to enter appropriate admission orders for patients admitted to the intensive care unit. The primary objective was to determine if this tool could improve the learners’ ability to enter an evidence-based, comprehensive initial care plan for critically ill patients. Methods: The authors created three modules using de-identifed real patient data from selected patients that were admitted to the intensive care unit. All senior residents (113 total) were invited to participate in a dedicated two-hour educational session to complete the modules. Learner performance was graded against gold standard admission order sets created by study investigators based on the latest evidence-based medicine and guidelines. Results: The session was attended by 39 residents (34.5% of invitees). There was an average improvement of at least 20% in users’ scores across the three modules (Module 3-Module 1 mean difference 22.5%; p = 0.001 and Module 3-Module 2 mean difference 20.3%; p = 0.001). Diagnostic acumen improved in successive modules. Almost 90% of the residents reported the technology was an effective form of teaching and would use it autonomously if more modules were provided. Conclusions: In this pilot project, using a novel educational tool, users’ patient care performance scores improved with a high level of user satisfaction. These results identify a realistic and well-received way to supplement residents’ training and assessment on core clinical care and patient management in the face of duty hour restrictions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1447211
JournalMedical Education Online
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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electronics
resident
Teaching
gold standard
ability
pilot project
patient care
supplement
performance
evidence
diagnostic
medicine
management

Keywords

  • computer-assisted instruction
  • educational tool
  • Electronic medical record
  • graduate medical education
  • medical education
  • virtual patients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

A pilot study : a teaching electronic medical record for educating and assessing residents in the care of patients. / Smith, Joshua; Carlos, William; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Takesue, Blaine; Litzelman, Debra.

In: Medical Education Online, Vol. 23, No. 1, 1447211, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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