A pilot study for augmenting atomoxetine with methylphenidate

Safety of concomitant therapy in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Gabrielle A. Carlson, David Dunn, Douglas Kelsey, Dustin Ruff, Susan Ball, Lisa Ahrbecker, Albert J. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: This study examined augmenting atomoxetine with extended-release methylphenidate in children whose attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) previously failed to respond adequately to stimulant medication. Methods: Children with ADHD and prior stimulant treatment (N = 25) received atomoxetine (1.2 mg/kg/day) plus placebo. After 4 weeks, patients who were responders (n = 4) were continued on atomoxetine/ placebo while remaining patients were randomly assigned to either methylphenidate (ATX/MPH) (1.1 mg/kg/day) or placebo augmentation (ATX/ PB) for another 6 weeks. Patients and sites were blind to timing of active augmentation. Safety measures included vital signs, weight, and adverse events. Efficacy was assessed by ADHD rating scales. Results: Categorical increases in vital signs occurred for 5 patients (3 patients in ATX/MPH, 2 patients in ATX/PBO). Sixteen percent discontinued the study due to AE, but no difference between augmentation groups. Atomoxetine treatment was efficacious on outcome measures (P ≤ .001), but methylphenidate did not enhance response. Conclusion: Methylphenidate appears to be safely combined with atomoxetine, but conclusions limited by small sample. With atomoxetine treatment, 43% of patients achieved normalization on ADHD ratings.

Original languageEnglish
Article number10
JournalChild and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
Volume1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 27 2007

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Methylphenidate
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Safety
Vital Signs
Placebos
Therapeutics
Atomoxetine Hydrochloride
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A pilot study for augmenting atomoxetine with methylphenidate : Safety of concomitant therapy in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. / Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Dunn, David; Kelsey, Douglas; Ruff, Dustin; Ball, Susan; Ahrbecker, Lisa; Allen, Albert J.

In: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, Vol. 1, 10, 27.09.2007.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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