A prospective study to assess the effect of ambulatory teaching on patient satisfaction

Patrick G. O'Malley, Deborah M. Omori, Francis J. Landry, Jeffrey Jackson, Kurt Kroenke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To assess the effect of ambulatory teaching on patient's satisfaction. Method. In 1996, 103 adult patient's presenting to the Walter- Reed General Medicine Walk-in Clinic completed a patient-satisfaction questionnaire immediately following their visits, during which they were initially seen by a trainee (third-year medical student or intern) and then seen by a faculty preceptor. The questionnaire includeed five items from the validated Medical Outcomes Study (MOS)-9 questionnaire as well as two open- ended questions. Fourteen staff physicians, 13 students (49% of the visits), and 11 interns (51% of the visits) participated in the study. Satisfaction was analyzed by level of training, and the responses from the study patients were compared with the responses from 372 usual-care (i.e., non-teaching) patients from the same clinic, using the chi-squared test. Results. The study patients were typically pleased with their encounters, rating their overall satisfaction as excellent (61%), very good (29%), or good (9%). Nearly two thirds of the patients rated their satisfaction with waiting time to be very good or excellent. Compared with the usual-care patients, the study patients reported equal or greater satisfaction for all five MOS-9 items. Ninety-five percent of the study patients said they would be willing to be seen by a trainee-staff team on the future visits. There was no difference in patients satisfaction by trainee level. The study patients cited enhanced interaction (45%), enhanced education (34%), and improved care (26%) as benefits of trainee-involved care, and increased waiting time (18%) and worse care (5%) as drawbacks. Conclusions. The results of this study suggest that ambulatory teaching does not adversely affect patient satisfaction, regardless of trainee level, and that patients who have been seen by trainee-staff teams are willing to experience such encounters again.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1015-1017
Number of pages3
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume72
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 1997

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Patient Satisfaction
Teaching
trainee
Prospective Studies
staff
questionnaire
general medicine
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
patient care
Medical Students
medical student
rating
Patient Care
physician
Medicine
Students
Physicians
Education
interaction
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

O'Malley, P. G., Omori, D. M., Landry, F. J., Jackson, J., & Kroenke, K. (1997). A prospective study to assess the effect of ambulatory teaching on patient satisfaction. Academic Medicine, 72(11), 1015-1017.

A prospective study to assess the effect of ambulatory teaching on patient satisfaction. / O'Malley, Patrick G.; Omori, Deborah M.; Landry, Francis J.; Jackson, Jeffrey; Kroenke, Kurt.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 72, No. 11, 11.1997, p. 1015-1017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

O'Malley, PG, Omori, DM, Landry, FJ, Jackson, J & Kroenke, K 1997, 'A prospective study to assess the effect of ambulatory teaching on patient satisfaction', Academic Medicine, vol. 72, no. 11, pp. 1015-1017.
O'Malley, Patrick G. ; Omori, Deborah M. ; Landry, Francis J. ; Jackson, Jeffrey ; Kroenke, Kurt. / A prospective study to assess the effect of ambulatory teaching on patient satisfaction. In: Academic Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 72, No. 11. pp. 1015-1017.
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