A randomized controlled trial of emotion recognition training after traumatic brain injury

Dawn Neumann, Duncan R. Babbage, Barbra Zupan, Barry Willer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the effectiveness of 2 affect recognition interventions (Faces and Stories) in people with a traumatic brain injury. Setting: Postacute rehabilitation facilities. Participants: A total of 203 participants with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury were screened; 71 were eligible and randomized to the Faces (n = 24), Stories (n = 23), and Control interventions (n = 24). Participants were an average of 39.8 years of age and 10.3 years postinjury; 74% of participants were male. Design: Randomized controlled trial with immediate, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up posttests. Interventions were 9 hours of computer-based training with a therapist. Measures: Diagnostic Assessment of Nonverbal Accuracy 2-Adult Faces; Emotional Inference From Stories Test; Empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index); and Irritability and Aggression (Neuropsychiatric Inventory). Results: The Faces Intervention did significantly better than the Control Intervention on the Diagnostic Assessment of Nonverbal Accuracy 2-Adult Faces (P = .031) posttreatment; no time effect or group interaction was observed. No other significant differences were noted for the Faces Intervention. No significant differences were observed between the Stories and the Control Interventions; however, a significant time effect was found for the Emotional Inference From Stories Test. Conclusion: The Faces Intervention effectively improved facial affect recognition in participants with chronic post-traumatic brain injury, and changes were maintained for 6 months. Future work should focus on generalizing this skill to functional behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E12-E23
JournalJournal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

Fingerprint

Emotions
Randomized Controlled Trials
Aggression
Rehabilitation
Equipment and Supplies
Traumatic Brain Injury

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Emotion recognition
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

A randomized controlled trial of emotion recognition training after traumatic brain injury. / Neumann, Dawn; Babbage, Duncan R.; Zupan, Barbra; Willer, Barry.

In: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, Vol. 30, No. 3, 01.05.2015, p. E12-E23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Neumann, Dawn ; Babbage, Duncan R. ; Zupan, Barbra ; Willer, Barry. / A randomized controlled trial of emotion recognition training after traumatic brain injury. In: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. E12-E23.
@article{18304456d67a46fe99f6677ccc9fbb8b,
title = "A randomized controlled trial of emotion recognition training after traumatic brain injury",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the effectiveness of 2 affect recognition interventions (Faces and Stories) in people with a traumatic brain injury. Setting: Postacute rehabilitation facilities. Participants: A total of 203 participants with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury were screened; 71 were eligible and randomized to the Faces (n = 24), Stories (n = 23), and Control interventions (n = 24). Participants were an average of 39.8 years of age and 10.3 years postinjury; 74{\%} of participants were male. Design: Randomized controlled trial with immediate, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up posttests. Interventions were 9 hours of computer-based training with a therapist. Measures: Diagnostic Assessment of Nonverbal Accuracy 2-Adult Faces; Emotional Inference From Stories Test; Empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index); and Irritability and Aggression (Neuropsychiatric Inventory). Results: The Faces Intervention did significantly better than the Control Intervention on the Diagnostic Assessment of Nonverbal Accuracy 2-Adult Faces (P = .031) posttreatment; no time effect or group interaction was observed. No other significant differences were noted for the Faces Intervention. No significant differences were observed between the Stories and the Control Interventions; however, a significant time effect was found for the Emotional Inference From Stories Test. Conclusion: The Faces Intervention effectively improved facial affect recognition in participants with chronic post-traumatic brain injury, and changes were maintained for 6 months. Future work should focus on generalizing this skill to functional behaviors.",
keywords = "Affect, Emotion recognition, Randomized controlled trial, Traumatic brain injury, Treatment",
author = "Dawn Neumann and Babbage, {Duncan R.} and Barbra Zupan and Barry Willer",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/HTR.0000000000000054",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "E12--E23",
journal = "Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation",
issn = "0885-9701",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomized controlled trial of emotion recognition training after traumatic brain injury

AU - Neumann, Dawn

AU - Babbage, Duncan R.

AU - Zupan, Barbra

AU - Willer, Barry

PY - 2015/5/1

Y1 - 2015/5/1

N2 - Objective: To examine the effectiveness of 2 affect recognition interventions (Faces and Stories) in people with a traumatic brain injury. Setting: Postacute rehabilitation facilities. Participants: A total of 203 participants with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury were screened; 71 were eligible and randomized to the Faces (n = 24), Stories (n = 23), and Control interventions (n = 24). Participants were an average of 39.8 years of age and 10.3 years postinjury; 74% of participants were male. Design: Randomized controlled trial with immediate, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up posttests. Interventions were 9 hours of computer-based training with a therapist. Measures: Diagnostic Assessment of Nonverbal Accuracy 2-Adult Faces; Emotional Inference From Stories Test; Empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index); and Irritability and Aggression (Neuropsychiatric Inventory). Results: The Faces Intervention did significantly better than the Control Intervention on the Diagnostic Assessment of Nonverbal Accuracy 2-Adult Faces (P = .031) posttreatment; no time effect or group interaction was observed. No other significant differences were noted for the Faces Intervention. No significant differences were observed between the Stories and the Control Interventions; however, a significant time effect was found for the Emotional Inference From Stories Test. Conclusion: The Faces Intervention effectively improved facial affect recognition in participants with chronic post-traumatic brain injury, and changes were maintained for 6 months. Future work should focus on generalizing this skill to functional behaviors.

AB - Objective: To examine the effectiveness of 2 affect recognition interventions (Faces and Stories) in people with a traumatic brain injury. Setting: Postacute rehabilitation facilities. Participants: A total of 203 participants with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury were screened; 71 were eligible and randomized to the Faces (n = 24), Stories (n = 23), and Control interventions (n = 24). Participants were an average of 39.8 years of age and 10.3 years postinjury; 74% of participants were male. Design: Randomized controlled trial with immediate, 3-month, and 6-month follow-up posttests. Interventions were 9 hours of computer-based training with a therapist. Measures: Diagnostic Assessment of Nonverbal Accuracy 2-Adult Faces; Emotional Inference From Stories Test; Empathy (Interpersonal Reactivity Index); and Irritability and Aggression (Neuropsychiatric Inventory). Results: The Faces Intervention did significantly better than the Control Intervention on the Diagnostic Assessment of Nonverbal Accuracy 2-Adult Faces (P = .031) posttreatment; no time effect or group interaction was observed. No other significant differences were noted for the Faces Intervention. No significant differences were observed between the Stories and the Control Interventions; however, a significant time effect was found for the Emotional Inference From Stories Test. Conclusion: The Faces Intervention effectively improved facial affect recognition in participants with chronic post-traumatic brain injury, and changes were maintained for 6 months. Future work should focus on generalizing this skill to functional behaviors.

KW - Affect

KW - Emotion recognition

KW - Randomized controlled trial

KW - Traumatic brain injury

KW - Treatment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84936743589&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84936743589&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000054

DO - 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000054

M3 - Article

C2 - 24842590

AN - SCOPUS:84936743589

VL - 30

SP - E12-E23

JO - Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation

JF - Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation

SN - 0885-9701

IS - 3

ER -