A Randomized Trial of Yoga for Children Hospitalized With Sickle Cell Vaso-Occlusive Crisis

Karen Moody, Bess Abrahams, Rebecca Baker, Ruth Santizo, Deepa Manwani, Veronica Carullo, Doris Eugenio, Aaron Carroll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Context Sickle cell disease (SCD) vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) remains an important cause of acute pain in pediatrics and the most common SCD complication. Pain management recommendations in SCD include nonpharmacological interventions. Yoga is one nonpharmacological intervention that has been shown to reduce pain in some populations; however, evidence is lacking in children with VOC. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to compare the effect of yoga vs. an attention control on pain in children with VOC. The secondary objectives were to compare the effect of yoga vs. an attention control on anxiety, lengths of stay, and opioid use in this population. Methods Patients were eligible if they had a diagnosis of SCD, were 5–21 years old, were hospitalized for uncomplicated VOC, and had an admission pain score of ≥7. Subjects were stratified based on disease severity and randomized to the yoga or control group. Results Eighty-three percent of patients approached (N = 73) enrolled on study. There were no significant differences in baseline clinical or demographic factors between groups. Compared with the control group, children randomized to yoga had a significantly greater reduction in mean pain score after one yoga session (−0.6 ± 0.96 vs. 0.0 ± 1.37; P = 0.029). There were no significant differences in anxiety, lengths of stay, or opioid use between the two groups. Conclusion This study provides evidence that yoga is an acceptable, feasible, and helpful intervention for hospitalized children with VOC. Future research should further examine yoga for children with SCD pain in the inpatient and outpatient settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1026-1034
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Pain and Symptom Management
Volume53
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Yoga
Hospitalized Child
Sickle Cell Anemia
Pain
Opioid Analgesics
Length of Stay
Anxiety
Control Groups
Acute Pain
Pain Management
Population
Inpatients
Outpatients
Demography
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • acute pain
  • Anemia
  • children
  • mind-body therapies
  • pain management
  • sickle cell
  • yoga

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

A Randomized Trial of Yoga for Children Hospitalized With Sickle Cell Vaso-Occlusive Crisis. / Moody, Karen; Abrahams, Bess; Baker, Rebecca; Santizo, Ruth; Manwani, Deepa; Carullo, Veronica; Eugenio, Doris; Carroll, Aaron.

In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Vol. 53, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 1026-1034.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moody, Karen ; Abrahams, Bess ; Baker, Rebecca ; Santizo, Ruth ; Manwani, Deepa ; Carullo, Veronica ; Eugenio, Doris ; Carroll, Aaron. / A Randomized Trial of Yoga for Children Hospitalized With Sickle Cell Vaso-Occlusive Crisis. In: Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. 2017 ; Vol. 53, No. 6. pp. 1026-1034.
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