A regional informatics platform for coordinated antibiotic-resistant infection tracking, alerting, and prevention

Abel N. Kho, Bradley N. Doebbeling, John P. Cashy, Marc Rosenman, Paul Dexter, David C. Shepherd, Larry Lemmon, Evgenia Teal, Shahid Khokar, J. Marc Overhage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. We developed and assessed the impact of a patient registry and electronic admission notification system relating to regional antimicrobial resistance (AMR) on regional AMR infection rates over time. We conducted an observational cohort study of all patients identified as infected or colonized with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and/or vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) on at least 1 occasion by any of 5 healthcare systems between 2003 and 2010. The 5 healthcare systems included 17 hospitals and associated clinics in the Indianapolis, Indiana, region.Methods. We developed and standardized a registry of MRSA and VRE patients and created Web forms that infection preventionists (IPs) used to maintain the lists. We sent e-mail alerts to IPs whenever a patient previously infected or colonized with MRSA or VRE registered for admission to a study hospital from June 2007 through June 2010.Results. Over a 3-year period, we delivered 12 748 e-mail alerts on 6270 unique patients to 24 IPs covering 17 hospitals. One in 5 (22%-23%) of all admission alerts was based on data from a healthcare system that was different from the admitting hospital; a few hospitals accounted for most of this crossover among facilities and systems.Conclusions. Regional patient registries identify an important patient cohort with relevant prior antibiotic-resistant infection data from different healthcare institutions. Regional registries can identify trends and interinstitutional movement not otherwise apparent from single institution data. Importantly, electronic alerts can notify of the need to isolate early and to institute other measures to prevent transmission.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)254-262
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Infectious Diseases
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2013

Fingerprint

Informatics
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Infection
Registries
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Delivery of Health Care
Postal Service
Observational Studies
Cohort Studies
Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococci

Keywords

  • clinical decision support
  • health information exchange
  • infection control
  • MRSA
  • VRE

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

A regional informatics platform for coordinated antibiotic-resistant infection tracking, alerting, and prevention. / Kho, Abel N.; Doebbeling, Bradley N.; Cashy, John P.; Rosenman, Marc; Dexter, Paul; Shepherd, David C.; Lemmon, Larry; Teal, Evgenia; Khokar, Shahid; Overhage, J. Marc.

In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol. 57, No. 2, 15.07.2013, p. 254-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kho, AN, Doebbeling, BN, Cashy, JP, Rosenman, M, Dexter, P, Shepherd, DC, Lemmon, L, Teal, E, Khokar, S & Overhage, JM 2013, 'A regional informatics platform for coordinated antibiotic-resistant infection tracking, alerting, and prevention', Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol. 57, no. 2, pp. 254-262. https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cit229
Kho, Abel N. ; Doebbeling, Bradley N. ; Cashy, John P. ; Rosenman, Marc ; Dexter, Paul ; Shepherd, David C. ; Lemmon, Larry ; Teal, Evgenia ; Khokar, Shahid ; Overhage, J. Marc. / A regional informatics platform for coordinated antibiotic-resistant infection tracking, alerting, and prevention. In: Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2013 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 254-262.
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