A review of the long-term health outcomes associated with war-related amputation

Christopher B. Robbins, Daniel Vreeman, Mark S. Sothmann, Stephen L. Wilson, Neil B. Oidridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rate of war-related amputations in current U.S. military personnel is now twice that experienced by military personnel in previous wars. We reviewed the literature for health outcomes following war-related amputations and 17 studies were retrieved with evidence that (a) amputees are at a significant risk for developing cardiovascular disease; (b) insulin may play an important role in regulating blood pressure in maturity-onset obesity; (c) lower-extremity amputees are at risk for joint pain and osteoarthritis; (d) trans femoral amputees report a higher incidence of low back pain than transtibial amputees; and (e) 50 to 80% report phantom limb pain, with many amputees stating they were either told that their pain was imagined or their mental state was questioned. The consistency of the observations on health outcomes in these studies warrants careful examination for their implication in the contemporary treatment of war-related amputation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)588-592
Number of pages5
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume174
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 2009

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Amputees
Amputation
Health
Military Personnel
Phantom Limb
Arthralgia
Low Back Pain
Thigh
Osteoarthritis
Lower Extremity
Cardiovascular Diseases
Obesity
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Warfare
Insulin
Blood Pressure
Pain
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Robbins, C. B., Vreeman, D., Sothmann, M. S., Wilson, S. L., & Oidridge, N. B. (2009). A review of the long-term health outcomes associated with war-related amputation. Military Medicine, 174(6), 588-592.

A review of the long-term health outcomes associated with war-related amputation. / Robbins, Christopher B.; Vreeman, Daniel; Sothmann, Mark S.; Wilson, Stephen L.; Oidridge, Neil B.

In: Military Medicine, Vol. 174, No. 6, 06.2009, p. 588-592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Robbins, CB, Vreeman, D, Sothmann, MS, Wilson, SL & Oidridge, NB 2009, 'A review of the long-term health outcomes associated with war-related amputation', Military Medicine, vol. 174, no. 6, pp. 588-592.
Robbins CB, Vreeman D, Sothmann MS, Wilson SL, Oidridge NB. A review of the long-term health outcomes associated with war-related amputation. Military Medicine. 2009 Jun;174(6):588-592.
Robbins, Christopher B. ; Vreeman, Daniel ; Sothmann, Mark S. ; Wilson, Stephen L. ; Oidridge, Neil B. / A review of the long-term health outcomes associated with war-related amputation. In: Military Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 174, No. 6. pp. 588-592.
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