A study of persistent post-concussion symptoms in mild head trauma using positron emission tomography

S. H Annabel Chen, David Kareken, P. S. Fastenau, L. E. Trexler, Gary Hutchins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Complaints of persistent cognitive deficits following mild head trauma are often uncorroborated by structural brain imaging and neuropsychological examination. Objective: To investigate, using positron emission tomography (PET), the in vivo changes in regional cerebral uptake of 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with persistent symptoms following mild head trauma. Methods: Five patients with mild head trauma and five age and education matched healthy controls were imaged using FDG-PET to measure differences in resting regional cerebral glucose metabolism. Oxygen-15 labelled water (H215O)-PET was also used to measure group differences in rCBF changes during a spatial working memory task. In addition, neuropsychological testing and self report of dysexecutive function and post-concussion symptoms were acquired to characterise the sample. Results: There was no difference between patients and controls in normalised regional cerebral FDG uptake in the resting state in frontal and temporal regions selected a priori. However, during the spatial working memory task, patients had a smaller increase in rCBF than controls in the right prefrontal cortex. Conclusions: Persistent post-concussive symptoms may not be associated with resting state hypometabolism. A cognitive challenge may be necessary to detect cerebral changes associated with mild head trauma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)326-332
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume74
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2003

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Post-Concussion Syndrome
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Craniocerebral Trauma
Positron-Emission Tomography
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Regional Blood Flow
Short-Term Memory
Temporal Lobe
Prefrontal Cortex
Neuroimaging
Self Report
Oxygen
Education
Glucose
Water

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

A study of persistent post-concussion symptoms in mild head trauma using positron emission tomography. / Chen, S. H Annabel; Kareken, David; Fastenau, P. S.; Trexler, L. E.; Hutchins, Gary.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 74, No. 3, 01.03.2003, p. 326-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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