A survey of potential adherence to capsule colonoscopy in patients who have accepted or declined conventional colonoscopy

Douglas Rex, David A. Lieberman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Capsule colonoscopy might improve adherence to colorectal cancer screening. Objective:: Measure attractiveness of capsule colonoscopy in patients who have declined conventional colonoscopy, using patients who have undergone colonoscopy as a control group. Desing: Internet-based survey. Setting: United States. Subjects: A total of 308 geographically diverse, high school or higher educated, middle to upper income, insured internet users who had been offered colonoscopy previously. Interventions: Survey. Main Outcome Measurements: Preferences for colonoscopy, capsule colonoscopy, fecal occult blood test, or no screening. Results: After a description of capsule technology features relative to colonoscopy, including "no need for a ride," "no time off work," "approximately 5% less accurate," "booster preparation needed," and "follow-up colonoscopy needed in 20% of patients," preference for capsule colonoscopy was shown by 24% of those who had undergone colonoscopy and 49% of those who had not. "No need for a ride" and "no time off work" were considered positive features of capsule colonoscopy. The potential to undergo capsule colonoscopy during the weekend was also considered attractive. Limitations: Restricted population. Conclusions: The availability of capsule colonoscopy could potentially increase colorectal cancer screening adherence rates among patients who decline screening colonoscopy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)691-695
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Volume46
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

Fingerprint

Colonoscopy
Capsules
Surveys and Questionnaires
Early Detection of Cancer
Internet
Colorectal Neoplasms
Occult Blood
Patient Preference
Hematologic Tests

Keywords

  • adherence
  • capsule colonoscopy
  • colonoscopy
  • screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

A survey of potential adherence to capsule colonoscopy in patients who have accepted or declined conventional colonoscopy. / Rex, Douglas; Lieberman, David A.

In: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, Vol. 46, No. 8, 09.2012, p. 691-695.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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