A survey of united states periodontists' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to tobacco-cessation interventions

Amit M. Patel, Steven Blanchard, Arden G. Christen, Robert W. Bandy, Laura Romito

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Because of the clear causal relationship between smoking and periodontal disease, and the negative effect of smoking on wound healing, it is of great importance to evaluate the tobacco-cessation interventions provided by periodontal practices. The use of tobacco-cessation interventions in clinical practice can be measured by whether the practitioner uses any of the "5 A's" defined by the 2008 United States Public Health Services Clinical Practice Guideline. Methods: Surveys were mailed to 1,000 active members of the American Academy of Periodontology. The surveys assessed the periodontists' demographic information, educational and professional background, knowledge and attitudes about tobacco cessation, and use of interventions in the daily practice of periodontics. Results: Data were collected from 231 periodontists via a self-administered survey. Most (92%) believed that tobacco cessation is a responsibility of the dental profession. A pattern of declining levels of involvement was seen as the providers moved through the suggested "5 A's" for promoting tobacco cessation. Providers with formal tobacco-cessation training were more likely to perform interventions. The primary perceived barriers to providing tobacco-cessation interventions were low patient acceptance of treatment, lack of time, and lack of training. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that periodontists believe that tobacco-cessation interventions are a responsibility of the dental profession; however, because of several perceived barriers, reported rates of comprehensive tobacco interventions in periodontal practices are low.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-376
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Periodontology
Volume82
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Cessation
Dentists
Tooth
Smoking
Periodontics
United States Public Health Service
Surveys and Questionnaires
Periodontal Diseases
Practice Guidelines
Wound Healing
Tobacco
Demography

Keywords

  • Health behavior
  • Nicotine
  • Oral health
  • Periodontal diseases
  • Smoking
  • Tobacco use cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Periodontics

Cite this

A survey of united states periodontists' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to tobacco-cessation interventions. / Patel, Amit M.; Blanchard, Steven; Christen, Arden G.; Bandy, Robert W.; Romito, Laura.

In: Journal of Periodontology, Vol. 82, No. 3, 03.2011, p. 367-376.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{80cf1c601b674d2db5dcb5e3b8d570db,
title = "A survey of united states periodontists' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to tobacco-cessation interventions",
abstract = "Background: Because of the clear causal relationship between smoking and periodontal disease, and the negative effect of smoking on wound healing, it is of great importance to evaluate the tobacco-cessation interventions provided by periodontal practices. The use of tobacco-cessation interventions in clinical practice can be measured by whether the practitioner uses any of the {"}5 A's{"} defined by the 2008 United States Public Health Services Clinical Practice Guideline. Methods: Surveys were mailed to 1,000 active members of the American Academy of Periodontology. The surveys assessed the periodontists' demographic information, educational and professional background, knowledge and attitudes about tobacco cessation, and use of interventions in the daily practice of periodontics. Results: Data were collected from 231 periodontists via a self-administered survey. Most (92{\%}) believed that tobacco cessation is a responsibility of the dental profession. A pattern of declining levels of involvement was seen as the providers moved through the suggested {"}5 A's{"} for promoting tobacco cessation. Providers with formal tobacco-cessation training were more likely to perform interventions. The primary perceived barriers to providing tobacco-cessation interventions were low patient acceptance of treatment, lack of time, and lack of training. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that periodontists believe that tobacco-cessation interventions are a responsibility of the dental profession; however, because of several perceived barriers, reported rates of comprehensive tobacco interventions in periodontal practices are low.",
keywords = "Health behavior, Nicotine, Oral health, Periodontal diseases, Smoking, Tobacco use cessation",
author = "Patel, {Amit M.} and Steven Blanchard and Christen, {Arden G.} and Bandy, {Robert W.} and Laura Romito",
year = "2011",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1902/jop.2010.100405",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "82",
pages = "367--376",
journal = "Journal of Periodontology",
issn = "0022-3492",
publisher = "American Academy of Periodontology",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A survey of united states periodontists' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to tobacco-cessation interventions

AU - Patel, Amit M.

AU - Blanchard, Steven

AU - Christen, Arden G.

AU - Bandy, Robert W.

AU - Romito, Laura

PY - 2011/3

Y1 - 2011/3

N2 - Background: Because of the clear causal relationship between smoking and periodontal disease, and the negative effect of smoking on wound healing, it is of great importance to evaluate the tobacco-cessation interventions provided by periodontal practices. The use of tobacco-cessation interventions in clinical practice can be measured by whether the practitioner uses any of the "5 A's" defined by the 2008 United States Public Health Services Clinical Practice Guideline. Methods: Surveys were mailed to 1,000 active members of the American Academy of Periodontology. The surveys assessed the periodontists' demographic information, educational and professional background, knowledge and attitudes about tobacco cessation, and use of interventions in the daily practice of periodontics. Results: Data were collected from 231 periodontists via a self-administered survey. Most (92%) believed that tobacco cessation is a responsibility of the dental profession. A pattern of declining levels of involvement was seen as the providers moved through the suggested "5 A's" for promoting tobacco cessation. Providers with formal tobacco-cessation training were more likely to perform interventions. The primary perceived barriers to providing tobacco-cessation interventions were low patient acceptance of treatment, lack of time, and lack of training. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that periodontists believe that tobacco-cessation interventions are a responsibility of the dental profession; however, because of several perceived barriers, reported rates of comprehensive tobacco interventions in periodontal practices are low.

AB - Background: Because of the clear causal relationship between smoking and periodontal disease, and the negative effect of smoking on wound healing, it is of great importance to evaluate the tobacco-cessation interventions provided by periodontal practices. The use of tobacco-cessation interventions in clinical practice can be measured by whether the practitioner uses any of the "5 A's" defined by the 2008 United States Public Health Services Clinical Practice Guideline. Methods: Surveys were mailed to 1,000 active members of the American Academy of Periodontology. The surveys assessed the periodontists' demographic information, educational and professional background, knowledge and attitudes about tobacco cessation, and use of interventions in the daily practice of periodontics. Results: Data were collected from 231 periodontists via a self-administered survey. Most (92%) believed that tobacco cessation is a responsibility of the dental profession. A pattern of declining levels of involvement was seen as the providers moved through the suggested "5 A's" for promoting tobacco cessation. Providers with formal tobacco-cessation training were more likely to perform interventions. The primary perceived barriers to providing tobacco-cessation interventions were low patient acceptance of treatment, lack of time, and lack of training. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that periodontists believe that tobacco-cessation interventions are a responsibility of the dental profession; however, because of several perceived barriers, reported rates of comprehensive tobacco interventions in periodontal practices are low.

KW - Health behavior

KW - Nicotine

KW - Oral health

KW - Periodontal diseases

KW - Smoking

KW - Tobacco use cessation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79952791552&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79952791552&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1902/jop.2010.100405

DO - 10.1902/jop.2010.100405

M3 - Article

C2 - 20809858

AN - SCOPUS:79952791552

VL - 82

SP - 367

EP - 376

JO - Journal of Periodontology

JF - Journal of Periodontology

SN - 0022-3492

IS - 3

ER -