A systematic review of school-based smoking prevention trials with long-term follow-up

Sarah Wiehe, Michelle M. Garrison, Dimitri A. Christakis, Beth E. Ebel, Frederick P. Rivara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

201 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Several systematic reviews of school-based smoking prevention trials have shown short-term decreases in smoking prevalence but have not examined long-term follow-up evaluation. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of rigorously evaluated interventions for school-based smoking prevention with long-term follow-up data. Methods: We searched online bibliographic databases and reference lists from review articles and selected studies. We included all school-based, randomized, controlled trials of smoking prevention with follow-up evaluation to age 18 or 12th grade and at least 1 year after intervention ended, and that had smoking prevalence as a primary outcome. The primary outcome was current smoking prevalence (defined as at least 1 cigarette in the past month). Results: The abstracts or full-text articles of 177 relevant studies were examined, of which 8 met the selection criteria. The 8 articles included studies differing in intervention intensity, presence of booster sessions, follow-up periods, and attrition rates. Only one study showed decreased smoking prevalence in the intervention group. Conclusions: Few studies have evaluated the long-term impact of school-based smoking prevention programs rigorously. Among the 8 programs that have follow-up data to age 18 or 12th grade, we found little to no evidence of long-term effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-169
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

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Smoking
Bibliographic Databases
Tobacco Products
Patient Selection
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • School
  • Smoking prevention
  • Youth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

A systematic review of school-based smoking prevention trials with long-term follow-up. / Wiehe, Sarah; Garrison, Michelle M.; Christakis, Dimitri A.; Ebel, Beth E.; Rivara, Frederick P.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 36, No. 3, 03.2005, p. 162-169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wiehe, Sarah ; Garrison, Michelle M. ; Christakis, Dimitri A. ; Ebel, Beth E. ; Rivara, Frederick P. / A systematic review of school-based smoking prevention trials with long-term follow-up. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2005 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 162-169.
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