Abdominal compartment syndrome

Aashish Patel, Chandana G. Lall, S. Gregory Jennings, Kumar Sandrasegaran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to discuss the pathogenesis, clinical features, radiologic findings, and treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome, which is defined as an acute elevation of the intraabdominal pressure with organ dysfunction. CONCLUSION. Abdominal compartment syndrome is not well reported in the radiology literature. In this review, we discuss a range of CT signs such as elevated diaphragm, collapsed inferior vena cava, bowel wall thickening, bowel mucosal hyperenhancement, hemoperitoneum, and increasing abdominal girth, which, in combination, may allow the radiologist to raise the possibility of abdominal compartment syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1037-1043
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume189
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

Fingerprint

Intra-Abdominal Hypertension
Hemoperitoneum
Inferior Vena Cava
Diaphragm
Radiology
Pressure
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Abdominal compartment syndrome
  • CT diagnosis
  • Intraabdominal hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Abdominal compartment syndrome. / Patel, Aashish; Lall, Chandana G.; Jennings, S. Gregory; Sandrasegaran, Kumar.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 189, No. 5, 11.2007, p. 1037-1043.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patel, Aashish ; Lall, Chandana G. ; Jennings, S. Gregory ; Sandrasegaran, Kumar. / Abdominal compartment syndrome. In: American Journal of Roentgenology. 2007 ; Vol. 189, No. 5. pp. 1037-1043.
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