Abstinence-only education policies and programs

A position paper of the Society for Adolescent Medicine

John Santelli, Mary Ott, Maureen Lyon, Jennifer Rogers, Daniel Summers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abstinence from sexual intercourse represents a healthy choice for teenagers, as teenagers face considerable risk to their reproductive health from unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Remaining abstinent, at least through high school, is strongly supported by parents and even by adolescents themselves. However, few Americans remain abstinent until marriage, many do not or cannot marry, and most initiate sexual intercourse and other sexual behaviors as adolescents. Abstinence as a behavioral goal is not the same as abstinence-only education programs. Abstinence from sexual intercourse, while theoretically fully protective, often fails to protect against pregnancy and disease in actual practice because abstinence is not maintained. Providing "abstinence only" or "abstinence until marriage" messages as a sole option for teenagers is flawed from scientific and medical ethics viewpoints. Efforts to promote abstinence should be based on sound science. Although federal support of abstinence-only programs has grown rapidly since 1996, the evaluations of such programs find little evidence of efficacy in delaying initiation of sexual intercourse. Conversely, efforts to promote abstinence, when offered as part of comprehensive reproductive health promotion programs that provide information about contraceptive options and protection from STIs have successfully delayed initiation of sexual intercourse. Moreover, abstinence-only programs are ethically problematic, being inherently coercive and often providing misinformation and withholding information needed to make informed choices. In many communities, abstinence-only education (AOE) has been replacing comprehensive sexuality education. In some communities, AOE has become the basis for suppression of free speech in schools. Abstinence-only education programs provide incomplete and/or misleading information about contraceptives, or none at all, and are often insensitive to sexually active teenagers. Federally funded abstinence-until-marriage programs discriminate against gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth, as federal law limits the definition of marriage to heterosexual couples. Schools and health care providers should encourage abstinence as an important option for teenagers. "Abstinence-only" as a basis for health policy and programs should be abandoned.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-87
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2006

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Coitus
Education
Marriage
Reproductive Health
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Contraceptive Agents
Transgender Persons
Pregnancy
Medical Ethics
School Health Services
Heterosexuality
Program Evaluation
Sexuality
Health Policy
Health Promotion
Sexual Behavior
Health Personnel
Parents
Communication
HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Abstinence-only education policies and programs : A position paper of the Society for Adolescent Medicine. / Santelli, John; Ott, Mary; Lyon, Maureen; Rogers, Jennifer; Summers, Daniel.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.2006, p. 83-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Santelli, John ; Ott, Mary ; Lyon, Maureen ; Rogers, Jennifer ; Summers, Daniel. / Abstinence-only education policies and programs : A position paper of the Society for Adolescent Medicine. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2006 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 83-87.
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