Academic versus clinical productivity of cardiac surgeons in the state of New York: Who publishes more and who operates more

Carlo Maria Rosati, Mario Gaudino, Panos N. Vardas, Daniel J. Weber, David Blitzer, Fawad Hameedi, Leonidas Koniaris, Leonard N. Girardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We investigated whether/how cardiac surgeons can be productive both academically and clinically. Using online resources (New York State Adult Cardiac Surgery database, SCOPUS), we collected individual clinical volumes (operations performed/year), academic metrics (ongoing publications, role as author), practice setting, and seniority for all cardiac surgeons in the State of New York from 1994 to 2011. Over time, individual clinical volumes decreased (median operations/ year: 193 in 1995 vs 126 in 2010; P < 0.001), whereas academic productivity remained unchanged (median publications/year: 0.7 vs 0.3; P 5 0.55). There was no correlation (Spearman’s correlation coefficient: 20.061; P 5 0.08) between the number of new publications and operations/year for the whole population. More operations/year (median: 155 vs 144; P 5 0.03) were performed by surgeons without versus with publications during that same year. Who published more worked at hospitals with higher clinical volumes (Spearman’s correlation coefficient: 0.16; P < 0.001) and was more likely affiliated with thoracic surgery fellowship programs (median publications/year: 1.7 for affiliated vs 0 for nonaffiliated surgeons; P < 0.001). Cardiac surgeons could be classified into four categories: w40 per cent clinically busy, but not publishing at all; w45 per cent operating less, but publishing a little; w15 per cent clinically very productive (operating as much as the nonpublishers) and publishing a lot; and w1 per cent operating the least, but publishing the most.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages71-79
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume84
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Thoracic Surgery
Surgeons
Databases
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Rosati, C. M., Gaudino, M., Vardas, P. N., Weber, D. J., Blitzer, D., Hameedi, F., ... Girardi, L. N. (2018). Academic versus clinical productivity of cardiac surgeons in the state of New York: Who publishes more and who operates more. American Surgeon, 84(1), 71-79.

Academic versus clinical productivity of cardiac surgeons in the state of New York : Who publishes more and who operates more. / Rosati, Carlo Maria; Gaudino, Mario; Vardas, Panos N.; Weber, Daniel J.; Blitzer, David; Hameedi, Fawad; Koniaris, Leonidas; Girardi, Leonard N.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 84, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 71-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rosati, CM, Gaudino, M, Vardas, PN, Weber, DJ, Blitzer, D, Hameedi, F, Koniaris, L & Girardi, LN 2018, 'Academic versus clinical productivity of cardiac surgeons in the state of New York: Who publishes more and who operates more' American Surgeon, vol. 84, no. 1, pp. 71-79.
Rosati CM, Gaudino M, Vardas PN, Weber DJ, Blitzer D, Hameedi F et al. Academic versus clinical productivity of cardiac surgeons in the state of New York: Who publishes more and who operates more. American Surgeon. 2018 Jan 1;84(1):71-79.
Rosati, Carlo Maria ; Gaudino, Mario ; Vardas, Panos N. ; Weber, Daniel J. ; Blitzer, David ; Hameedi, Fawad ; Koniaris, Leonidas ; Girardi, Leonard N. / Academic versus clinical productivity of cardiac surgeons in the state of New York : Who publishes more and who operates more. In: American Surgeon. 2018 ; Vol. 84, No. 1. pp. 71-79.
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