Acceptability and results of dementia screening among older adults in the United States

Amanda Harrawood, Nicole Fowler, Anthony J. Perkins, Michael A. LaMantia, Malaz Boustani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives: To measure older adults acceptability of dementia screening and assess screening test results of a racially diverse sample of older primary care patients in the United States. Design: Cross-sectional study of primary care patients aged 65 and older. Setting: Urban and suburban primary care clinics in Indianapolis, Indiana, in 2008 to 2009. Participants: Nine hundred fifty-four primary care patients without a documented diagnosis of dementia. Measurements: Community Screening Instrument for Dementia, the Mini-Mental State Examination, and the Telephone Instrument for Cognitive Screening. Results: Of the 954 study participants who consented to participate, 748 agreed to be screened for dementia and 206 refused screening. The overall response rate was 78.4%. The positive screen rate of the sample who agreed to screening was 10.2%. After adjusting for demographic differences the following characteristics were still associated with increased likelihood of screening positive for dementia: age, male sex, and lower education. Patients who believed that they had more memory problems than other people of their age were also more likely to screen positive for dementia. Conclusion: Age and perceived problems with memory are associated with screening positive for dementia in primary care

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages51-55
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Alzheimer Research
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Dementia
Primary Health Care
Sex Education
Telephone
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Dementia screening
  • Diagnostic assessment
  • Memory
  • Primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Acceptability and results of dementia screening among older adults in the United States. / Harrawood, Amanda; Fowler, Nicole; Perkins, Anthony J.; LaMantia, Michael A.; Boustani, Malaz.

In: Current Alzheimer Research, Vol. 15, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 51-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harrawood, Amanda ; Fowler, Nicole ; Perkins, Anthony J. ; LaMantia, Michael A. ; Boustani, Malaz. / Acceptability and results of dementia screening among older adults in the United States. In: Current Alzheimer Research. 2018 ; Vol. 15, No. 1. pp. 51-55.
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