Acceptability of a telecare intervention for persistent musculoskeletal pain

Rebecca E. Guilkey, Claire B. Draucker, Jingwei Wu, Zhangsheng Yu, Kurt Kroenke

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Introduction: Persistent musculoskeletal pain is a prevalent, disabling, and often undertreated condition. This paper examines the acceptability of a telecare intervention for this condition. Methods: The Stepped Care to Optimize Pain Care Effectiveness (SCOPE) intervention couples automatic symptom monitoring (ASM) with optimized analgesic care management by a nurse-physician team. Data from participants in the telecare intervention arm (n = 124) of a randomized control trial of SCOPE were analysed to determine the acceptability of the telecare intervention as indicated by patient use and satisfaction. Results: Most (93.5%) patients completed at least one ASM report, selecting equally web-based (49%) or interactive voice-recorded (51%) reporting. The median number of ASM reports and nurse contacts per patient was 15 and 12, respectively. Of 12 demographic and clinical factors examined, none predicted the number of ASM reports, whereas nurse contacts were more frequent in patients with higher pain severity or receiving opioids. Only a minority of ASM reports required an expedited nurse call, with the most frequent alerts being for a medication change, a nurse call or side effects. Most (92%) patients rated ASM as easy to use and found the ASM reporting (76%) and nurse contacts (81%) very or moderately helpful. Nearly three-fourths of patients rated their overall pain treatment as good to excellent. The most common suggestions from patient feedback were for a free-text messaging function, more frequent nurse contact and less redundancy in ASM reporting items. Discussion: Participants generally found the telecare intervention a user-friendly and helpful approach for treating persistent musculoskeletal pain.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages44-50
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Telemedicine and Telecare
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Musculoskeletal Pain
Nurses
Pain
Text Messaging
Patient Satisfaction
Opioid Analgesics
Analgesics
Demography
Physicians
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • acceptability
  • musculoskeletal pain
  • perceived usefulness
  • persistent pain
  • satisfaction
  • Telecare
  • therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Informatics

Cite this

Acceptability of a telecare intervention for persistent musculoskeletal pain. / Guilkey, Rebecca E.; Draucker, Claire B.; Wu, Jingwei; Yu, Zhangsheng; Kroenke, Kurt.

In: Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 44-50.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

@article{8a7ffcc66a6d4571a2fe6cc1f1cf6e06,
title = "Acceptability of a telecare intervention for persistent musculoskeletal pain",
abstract = "Introduction: Persistent musculoskeletal pain is a prevalent, disabling, and often undertreated condition. This paper examines the acceptability of a telecare intervention for this condition. Methods: The Stepped Care to Optimize Pain Care Effectiveness (SCOPE) intervention couples automatic symptom monitoring (ASM) with optimized analgesic care management by a nurse-physician team. Data from participants in the telecare intervention arm (n = 124) of a randomized control trial of SCOPE were analysed to determine the acceptability of the telecare intervention as indicated by patient use and satisfaction. Results: Most (93.5%) patients completed at least one ASM report, selecting equally web-based (49%) or interactive voice-recorded (51%) reporting. The median number of ASM reports and nurse contacts per patient was 15 and 12, respectively. Of 12 demographic and clinical factors examined, none predicted the number of ASM reports, whereas nurse contacts were more frequent in patients with higher pain severity or receiving opioids. Only a minority of ASM reports required an expedited nurse call, with the most frequent alerts being for a medication change, a nurse call or side effects. Most (92%) patients rated ASM as easy to use and found the ASM reporting (76%) and nurse contacts (81%) very or moderately helpful. Nearly three-fourths of patients rated their overall pain treatment as good to excellent. The most common suggestions from patient feedback were for a free-text messaging function, more frequent nurse contact and less redundancy in ASM reporting items. Discussion: Participants generally found the telecare intervention a user-friendly and helpful approach for treating persistent musculoskeletal pain.",
keywords = "acceptability, musculoskeletal pain, perceived usefulness, persistent pain, satisfaction, Telecare, therapy",
author = "Guilkey, {Rebecca E.} and Draucker, {Claire B.} and Jingwei Wu and Zhangsheng Yu and Kurt Kroenke",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1357633X16670815",
volume = "24",
pages = "44--50",
journal = "Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare",
issn = "1357-633X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acceptability of a telecare intervention for persistent musculoskeletal pain

AU - Guilkey,Rebecca E.

AU - Draucker,Claire B.

AU - Wu,Jingwei

AU - Yu,Zhangsheng

AU - Kroenke,Kurt

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Introduction: Persistent musculoskeletal pain is a prevalent, disabling, and often undertreated condition. This paper examines the acceptability of a telecare intervention for this condition. Methods: The Stepped Care to Optimize Pain Care Effectiveness (SCOPE) intervention couples automatic symptom monitoring (ASM) with optimized analgesic care management by a nurse-physician team. Data from participants in the telecare intervention arm (n = 124) of a randomized control trial of SCOPE were analysed to determine the acceptability of the telecare intervention as indicated by patient use and satisfaction. Results: Most (93.5%) patients completed at least one ASM report, selecting equally web-based (49%) or interactive voice-recorded (51%) reporting. The median number of ASM reports and nurse contacts per patient was 15 and 12, respectively. Of 12 demographic and clinical factors examined, none predicted the number of ASM reports, whereas nurse contacts were more frequent in patients with higher pain severity or receiving opioids. Only a minority of ASM reports required an expedited nurse call, with the most frequent alerts being for a medication change, a nurse call or side effects. Most (92%) patients rated ASM as easy to use and found the ASM reporting (76%) and nurse contacts (81%) very or moderately helpful. Nearly three-fourths of patients rated their overall pain treatment as good to excellent. The most common suggestions from patient feedback were for a free-text messaging function, more frequent nurse contact and less redundancy in ASM reporting items. Discussion: Participants generally found the telecare intervention a user-friendly and helpful approach for treating persistent musculoskeletal pain.

AB - Introduction: Persistent musculoskeletal pain is a prevalent, disabling, and often undertreated condition. This paper examines the acceptability of a telecare intervention for this condition. Methods: The Stepped Care to Optimize Pain Care Effectiveness (SCOPE) intervention couples automatic symptom monitoring (ASM) with optimized analgesic care management by a nurse-physician team. Data from participants in the telecare intervention arm (n = 124) of a randomized control trial of SCOPE were analysed to determine the acceptability of the telecare intervention as indicated by patient use and satisfaction. Results: Most (93.5%) patients completed at least one ASM report, selecting equally web-based (49%) or interactive voice-recorded (51%) reporting. The median number of ASM reports and nurse contacts per patient was 15 and 12, respectively. Of 12 demographic and clinical factors examined, none predicted the number of ASM reports, whereas nurse contacts were more frequent in patients with higher pain severity or receiving opioids. Only a minority of ASM reports required an expedited nurse call, with the most frequent alerts being for a medication change, a nurse call or side effects. Most (92%) patients rated ASM as easy to use and found the ASM reporting (76%) and nurse contacts (81%) very or moderately helpful. Nearly three-fourths of patients rated their overall pain treatment as good to excellent. The most common suggestions from patient feedback were for a free-text messaging function, more frequent nurse contact and less redundancy in ASM reporting items. Discussion: Participants generally found the telecare intervention a user-friendly and helpful approach for treating persistent musculoskeletal pain.

KW - acceptability

KW - musculoskeletal pain

KW - perceived usefulness

KW - persistent pain

KW - satisfaction

KW - Telecare

KW - therapy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85040468793&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85040468793&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1357633X16670815

DO - 10.1177/1357633X16670815

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 44

EP - 50

JO - Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare

T2 - Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare

JF - Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare

SN - 1357-633X

IS - 1

ER -