Acceptability of Group Visits for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Pediatric Clinics

Nerissa Bauer, Nina Azer, Paula D. Sullivan, Dorota Szczepaniak, Sarah Stelzner, Stephen Downs, Aaron Carroll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have ongoing needs that impair home and school functioning. Group visit models are a promising way to deliver timely parenting support but family and provider acceptance has not previously been examined. The objective was to describe the acceptability of ADHD group visits in busy pediatric clinics based on caregivers, child participants and facilitators. Methods: Data were analyzed from school-age children and caregivers who participated in one of two 12-month long randomized controlled studies of the ADHD group visit model from 2012 to 2013 or 2014 to 2015. Feedback was obtained using semi-structured questions at each study end, by telephone or at the last group visit. Sessions were audio-recorded, transcribed and themes were extracted by participant type. Results: A total of 34 caregivers, 41 children and 9 facilitators offered feedback. Caregivers enjoyed the "support group" aspect and learning new things from others. Caregivers reported improved understanding of ADHD and positive changes in the relationship with their child. Children were able to recall specific skills learned including how skills helped at home or school. Facilitators acknowledged systems-level challenges to offering group visits but felt the group format helped increase understanding of families' needs, improved overall care, and provided innovative ways to engage with families. Conclusion: The majority of comments from families and facilitators highlighted a variety of benefits of the use of a group visit model for ADHD chronic care. Despite systems-level barriers to implementation, families and facilitators felt the benefits outweighed the challenges.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)565-572
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
Caregivers
Pediatrics
Self-Help Groups
Parenting
Telephone
Learning

Keywords

  • group visits
  • Index terms: ADHD
  • intervention
  • primary care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Acceptability of Group Visits for Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Pediatric Clinics. / Bauer, Nerissa; Azer, Nina; Sullivan, Paula D.; Szczepaniak, Dorota; Stelzner, Sarah; Downs, Stephen; Carroll, Aaron.

In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Vol. 38, No. 8, 01.10.2017, p. 565-572.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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