Acceptability of the Vaginal Contraceptive Ring Among Adolescent Women

Lekeisha R. Terrell, Amanda E. Tanner, Devon J. Hensel, Margaret J. Blythe, J. Dennis Fortenberry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objective: Although underutilized, the vaginal contraceptive ring has several advantages over other contraceptive methods that could benefit adolescents. We examined factors that may influence willingness to try the vaginal ring including: sexual and contraceptive history, genital comfort, and vaginal ring characteristics. Design: Cross sectional. Setting: Midwestern adolescent health clinics. Participants: Adolescent women (N = 200; 14-18 years; 89% African-American). Interventions/Main Outcome Measures: All participants received education about the vaginal ring and viewed pictures demonstrating insertion; they then completed a visual/audio computer-assisted self interview. The primary outcome variable, willingness to try the vaginal ring, was a single Likert-scale item. Results: Over half the participants reported knowledge of the vaginal ring with healthcare providers identified as the most important source of contraceptive information. Comfort with one's genitals, insertion and removal, using alternative methods of insertion, and knowing positive method characteristics were significantly associated with willingness to try the vaginal ring. A decreased willingness to try the vaginal ring was related to concerns of the ring getting lost inside or falling out of the vagina. Conclusions: Willingness to try the ring was associated with positive feelings about genitals (e.g., comfort with appearance, hygiene, function). Thus, to increase willingness to try the vaginal ring among adolescents, providers should make it common practice to discuss basic female reproductive anatomy, raise awareness about female genital health and address concerns about their genitals. Providers can offer alternative insertion techniques (e.g., gloves) to make use more accessible. These strategies may increase vaginal ring use among adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)204-210
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Fingerprint

Female Contraceptive Devices
Contraceptive Agents
Accidental Falls
Reproductive History
Vagina
Hygiene
Contraception
African Americans
Health Personnel
Anatomy
Emotions
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • Acceptability
  • Adolescent
  • Contraception
  • Genital comfort
  • Vaginal ring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Acceptability of the Vaginal Contraceptive Ring Among Adolescent Women. / Terrell, Lekeisha R.; Tanner, Amanda E.; Hensel, Devon J.; Blythe, Margaret J.; Fortenberry, J. Dennis.

In: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology, Vol. 24, No. 4, 08.2011, p. 204-210.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Terrell, Lekeisha R. ; Tanner, Amanda E. ; Hensel, Devon J. ; Blythe, Margaret J. ; Fortenberry, J. Dennis. / Acceptability of the Vaginal Contraceptive Ring Among Adolescent Women. In: Journal of Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. 2011 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 204-210.
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