Acoustic shielding by cavitation bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

Yuri A. Pishchalnikov, James A. McAteer, Michael R. Bailey, Irina V. Pishchalnikova, James C. Williams, Andrew P. Evan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lithotripter pulses (∼7-10 μs) initiate the growth of cavitation bubbles, which collapse hundreds of microseconds later. Since the bubble growth-collapse cycle trails passage of the pulse, and is ∼1000 times shorter than the pulse interval at clinically relevant firing rates, it is not expected that cavitation will affect pulse propagation. However, pressure measurements with a fiber-optic hydrophone (FOPH-500) indicate that bubbles generated by a pulse can, indeed, shield the propagation of the negative tail. Shielding was detected within 1 μs of arrival of the negative wave, contemporaneous with the first observation of expanding bubbles by high-speed camera. Reduced negative pressure was observed at 2 Hz compared to 0.5 Hz firing rate, and in water with a higher content of dissolved gas. We propose that shielding of the negative tail can be attributed to loss of acoustic energy into the expansion of cavitation bubbles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationINNOVATIONS IN NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS - ISNA 17
Subtitle of host publication17th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics including the International Sonic Boom Forum
Pages319-322
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
EventINNOVATIONS IN NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS - ISNA17: 17th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics including the International Sonic Boom Forum - State College, PA, United States
Duration: Jul 18 2005Jul 22 2005

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume838
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Other

OtherINNOVATIONS IN NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS - ISNA17: 17th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics including the International Sonic Boom Forum
CountryUnited States
CityState College, PA
Period7/18/057/22/05

Fingerprint

cavitation flow
shielding
shock waves
bubbles
acoustics
pulses
dissolved gases
propagation
high speed cameras
hydrophones
pressure measurement
arrivals
fiber optics
intervals
cycles
expansion
water
energy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Pishchalnikov, Y. A., McAteer, J. A., Bailey, M. R., Pishchalnikova, I. V., Williams, J. C., & Evan, A. P. (2006). Acoustic shielding by cavitation bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL). In INNOVATIONS IN NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS - ISNA 17: 17th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics including the International Sonic Boom Forum (pp. 319-322). (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 838). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2210369

Acoustic shielding by cavitation bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL). / Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.

INNOVATIONS IN NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS - ISNA 17: 17th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics including the International Sonic Boom Forum. 2006. p. 319-322 (AIP Conference Proceedings; Vol. 838).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Pishchalnikov, YA, McAteer, JA, Bailey, MR, Pishchalnikova, IV, Williams, JC & Evan, AP 2006, Acoustic shielding by cavitation bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL). in INNOVATIONS IN NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS - ISNA 17: 17th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics including the International Sonic Boom Forum. AIP Conference Proceedings, vol. 838, pp. 319-322, INNOVATIONS IN NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS - ISNA17: 17th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics including the International Sonic Boom Forum, State College, PA, United States, 7/18/05. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2210369
Pishchalnikov YA, McAteer JA, Bailey MR, Pishchalnikova IV, Williams JC, Evan AP. Acoustic shielding by cavitation bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL). In INNOVATIONS IN NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS - ISNA 17: 17th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics including the International Sonic Boom Forum. 2006. p. 319-322. (AIP Conference Proceedings). https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2210369
Pishchalnikov, Yuri A. ; McAteer, James A. ; Bailey, Michael R. ; Pishchalnikova, Irina V. ; Williams, James C. ; Evan, Andrew P. / Acoustic shielding by cavitation bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL). INNOVATIONS IN NONLINEAR ACOUSTICS - ISNA 17: 17th International Symposium on Nonlinear Acoustics including the International Sonic Boom Forum. 2006. pp. 319-322 (AIP Conference Proceedings).
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