Actin Fiber Patterns Detected by Alexafluor 488 Phalloidin Suggest Similar Cell Migration in Regenerating and Nonregenerating Rodent Toes

Daniel A. Neufeld, Steve Hosman, Tammy Yescas, Khalid Mohammad, Frances Day, Suleman Said

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although mammals do not regenerate most appendages, they are able to regenerate toetips if the amputation occurs through the nail bed. The reasons for different outcomes following amputation at different levels are not understood. It is possible that cells at regenerating and nonregenerating sites migrate from fundamentally different tissues. If so, different migratory pathways could be detected. To identify putative migrating cells, microscope slides were made from both regenerating and nonregenerating toes of rats and mice on successive days after amputation. Fluorescent-labeled phalloidin, which binds polymerized f-actin, was used to identify actin filaments and fibers. Cells containing prominent actin bundles were distinguishable from those containing diffuse fibrils and those in which visible fibers were absent. Phalloidin labeling was similar in regenerating and nonregenerating digits after amputation. As early as 2 days after amputation at either proximal or distal levels, many cells of the hypodermis adjacent to the wound became labeled with phalloidin. The number and intensity of labeled hypodermal cells containing stress fiber-like bundles increased rapidly with time, and at successive times cells were seen progressively further distally. By approximately 7 days, they occupied the wound site immediately distal to bone of both regenerating and nonregenerating digits. Most dermal cells were unlabeled and endosteal and marrow cells contained only fibrillar actin. Phalloidin labeling does not support the concept of migration from different tissues in regenerating and nonregenerating amputation sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-453
Number of pages4
JournalAnatomical Record - Part A Discoveries in Molecular, Cellular, and Evolutionary Biology
Volume278
Issue number1
StatePublished - May 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Phalloidine
Toes
cell movement
Cell Movement
actin
amputation
Actins
Rodentia
rodents
Amputation
cells
animal injuries
nails (equipment)
Stress Fibers
Subcutaneous Tissue
Wounds and Injuries
Nails
microfilaments
appendages
Actin Cytoskeleton

Keywords

  • Actin
  • Amputation
  • Phalloidin
  • Regeneration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Anatomy

Cite this

Actin Fiber Patterns Detected by Alexafluor 488 Phalloidin Suggest Similar Cell Migration in Regenerating and Nonregenerating Rodent Toes. / Neufeld, Daniel A.; Hosman, Steve; Yescas, Tammy; Mohammad, Khalid; Day, Frances; Said, Suleman.

In: Anatomical Record - Part A Discoveries in Molecular, Cellular, and Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 278, No. 1, 05.2004, p. 450-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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