Actinomycosis

A Cause of Pulmonary and Mediastinal Mass Lesions in Children

Stanley Spinola, R. Alan Bell, Frederick W. Henderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two patients with intrathoracic actinomycosis were examined. One child was asymptomatic and had a slowly expanding lesion in the left upper lobe. The other child had a chronic illness with back pain, weight loss, amenorrhea, and a posterior mediastinal mass. Establishing the cause of these lesions and making the distinction between a neoplastic process and infection were particularly difficult in both cases. Intrathoracic actinomycosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary and mediastinal mass lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)336-339
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Diseases of Children
Volume135
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Actinomycosis
Neoplastic Processes
Lung
Amenorrhea
Back Pain
Weight Loss
Differential Diagnosis
Chronic Disease
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Actinomycosis : A Cause of Pulmonary and Mediastinal Mass Lesions in Children. / Spinola, Stanley; Bell, R. Alan; Henderson, Frederick W.

In: American Journal of Diseases of Children, Vol. 135, No. 4, 1981, p. 336-339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Spinola, Stanley ; Bell, R. Alan ; Henderson, Frederick W. / Actinomycosis : A Cause of Pulmonary and Mediastinal Mass Lesions in Children. In: American Journal of Diseases of Children. 1981 ; Vol. 135, No. 4. pp. 336-339.
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