Activation during ventricular defibrillation in open-chest dogs. Evidence of complete cessation and regeneration of ventricular fibrillation after unsuccessful shocks

Peng-Sheng Chen, N. Shibata, E. G. Dixon, P. D. Wolf, N. D. Danieley, M. B. Sweeney, W. M. Smith, R. E. Ideker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

208 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To test the hypothesis that a defibrillation shock is unsuccessful because it fails to annihilate activation fronts within a critical mass of myocardium, we recorded epicardial and transmural activation in 11 open-chest dogs during electrically induced ventricular fibrillation (VF). Shocks of 1-30 J were delivered through defibrillation electrodes on the left ventricular apex and right atrium. Simultaneous recordings were made from septal, intramural, and epicardial electrodes in various combinations. Immediately after all 104 unsuccessful and 116 successful defibrillation shocks, an isoelectric interval much longer than that observed during preshock VF occurred. During this time no epicardial, septal, or intramural activations were observed. This isoelectric window averaged 64 ± 22 ms after unsuccessful defibrillation and 339 ± 292 ms after successful defibrillation (P <0.02). After the isoelectric window of unsuccessful shocks, earliest activation was recorded from the base of the ventricles, which was the area farthest from the apical defibrillation electrode. Activation was synchronized for one or two cycles following unsuccessful shocks, after which VF regenerated. Thus, (a) after both successful and unsuccessful defibrillation with epicardial shocks of ≥1 J, an isoelectric window occurs during which no activation fronts are present; (b) the postshock isoelectric window is shorter for unsuccessful than for successful defibrillation; (c) unsuccessful shocks transiently synchronize activation before fibrillation regenerates; (d) activation leading to the regeneration of VF after the isoelectric window for unsuccessful shocks originates in areas away from the defibrillation electrodes. The isoelectric window does not support the hypothesis that defibrillation fails solely because activation fronts are not halted within a critical mass of myocardium. Rather, unsuccessful epicardial shocks of ≥1 J halt all activation fronts after which VF regenerates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)810-823
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Clinical Investigation
Volume77
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Ventricular Fibrillation
Regeneration
Shock
Thorax
Dogs
Electrodes
Myocardium
Heart Atria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Activation during ventricular defibrillation in open-chest dogs. Evidence of complete cessation and regeneration of ventricular fibrillation after unsuccessful shocks. / Chen, Peng-Sheng; Shibata, N.; Dixon, E. G.; Wolf, P. D.; Danieley, N. D.; Sweeney, M. B.; Smith, W. M.; Ideker, R. E.

In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol. 77, No. 3, 1986, p. 810-823.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Peng-Sheng ; Shibata, N. ; Dixon, E. G. ; Wolf, P. D. ; Danieley, N. D. ; Sweeney, M. B. ; Smith, W. M. ; Ideker, R. E. / Activation during ventricular defibrillation in open-chest dogs. Evidence of complete cessation and regeneration of ventricular fibrillation after unsuccessful shocks. In: Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1986 ; Vol. 77, No. 3. pp. 810-823.
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AU - Dixon, E. G.

AU - Wolf, P. D.

AU - Danieley, N. D.

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