Adaptive functioning in children with epilepsy and learning problems

Janice Buelow, Susan Perkins, Cynthia S. Johnson, Anna W. Byars, Philip S. Fastenau, David Dunn, Joan K. Austin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the study we describe adaptive functioning in children with epilepsy whose primary caregivers identified them as having learning problems. This was a cross-sectional study of 50 children with epilepsy and learning problems. Caregivers supplied information regarding the child's adaptive functioning and behavior problems. Children rated their self-concept and completed a battery of neuropsychological tests. Mean estimated IQ (PPVT-III) in the participant children was 72.8 (SD = 18.3). On average, children scored 2 standard deviations below the norm on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale-II and this was true even for children with epilepsy who had estimated IQ in the normal range. In conclusion, children with epilepsy and learning problems had relatively low adaptive functioning scores and substantial neuropsychological and mental health problems. In epilepsy, adaptive behavior screening can be very informative and guide further evaluation and intervention, even in those children whose IQ is in the normal range.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1241-1249
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume27
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Epilepsy
Learning
Psychological Adaptation
Caregivers
Reference Values
Neuropsychological Tests
Self Concept
Mental Health
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • adaptive functioning
  • epilepsy
  • learning
  • mental health
  • seizure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Buelow, J., Perkins, S., Johnson, C. S., Byars, A. W., Fastenau, P. S., Dunn, D., & Austin, J. K. (2012). Adaptive functioning in children with epilepsy and learning problems. Journal of Child Neurology, 27(10), 1241-1249. https://doi.org/10.1177/0883073811432750

Adaptive functioning in children with epilepsy and learning problems. / Buelow, Janice; Perkins, Susan; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Byars, Anna W.; Fastenau, Philip S.; Dunn, David; Austin, Joan K.

In: Journal of Child Neurology, Vol. 27, No. 10, 10.2012, p. 1241-1249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buelow, J, Perkins, S, Johnson, CS, Byars, AW, Fastenau, PS, Dunn, D & Austin, JK 2012, 'Adaptive functioning in children with epilepsy and learning problems', Journal of Child Neurology, vol. 27, no. 10, pp. 1241-1249. https://doi.org/10.1177/0883073811432750
Buelow, Janice ; Perkins, Susan ; Johnson, Cynthia S. ; Byars, Anna W. ; Fastenau, Philip S. ; Dunn, David ; Austin, Joan K. / Adaptive functioning in children with epilepsy and learning problems. In: Journal of Child Neurology. 2012 ; Vol. 27, No. 10. pp. 1241-1249.
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