Adolescent romantic couples influence on substance use in young adulthood

Lauren C. Gudonis-Miller, Lisa Lewis, Yan Tong, Wanzhu Tu, Matthew Aalsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Research has demonstrated that adolescent peer group affiliations are consistent predictors of substance use initiation and maintenance; it is less clear how adolescent . romantic relationships influence substance use behavior. Data were drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Participants in the final dataset for the current study included adolescents (321 males and 321 females) who were identified in reciprocated romantic relationships at Wave 1 (1994-1995; mean age 16.7 years) that were followed into young adulthood and reassessed at two different time points (Wave 2 in 1996, mean age 17.7, and Wave 3 in 2001-2002, mean age 23.1). Data were gathered from both partners, and included demographic variables, longitudinal measures of substance use (alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana), and relationship seriousness. Hierarchical linear modeling using SAS PROC MIXED were utilized to test for individual versus partner influences. Results revealed individual and partner effects for the prediction of alcohol and tobacco, although individual effects were generally greater than partner influences. For marijuana use, as self-reported relationship seriousness increased, future marijuana use decreased. These findings suggest the developmental significance of adolescent romantic relationships on the prediction of future substance use behavior during young adulthood.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)638-647
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Adolescence
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2012

Fingerprint

Cannabis
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health
Alcohols
Peer Group
Tobacco Use
Tobacco
Maintenance
Demography
Research

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Development
  • Longitudinal
  • Romantic relationships
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Adolescent romantic couples influence on substance use in young adulthood. / Gudonis-Miller, Lauren C.; Lewis, Lisa; Tong, Yan; Tu, Wanzhu; Aalsma, Matthew.

In: Journal of Adolescence, Vol. 35, No. 3, 06.2012, p. 638-647.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gudonis-Miller, Lauren C. ; Lewis, Lisa ; Tong, Yan ; Tu, Wanzhu ; Aalsma, Matthew. / Adolescent romantic couples influence on substance use in young adulthood. In: Journal of Adolescence. 2012 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 638-647.
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