Adolescent women's daily academic behaviors, sexual behaviors, and sexually related emotions

Devon J. Hensel, Brandon H. Sorge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose Emerging literature suggests that the emotional and behavioral experience in young women's romantic/sexual relationships may link to their academic success. However, existing studies' reliance on retrospective and/or global measures prevents detailed understanding of how and when specific academic experiences link to specific relationship experiences and whether these associations could vary over different school days.

Methods Adolescent women (N = 387; 14-17 years at enrollment) were recruited from primary care adolescent clinics for a longitudinal cohort study of sexual relationships and sexual behavior. Participants provided daily diary information on academic behaviors, sexual emotions, and sexual behaviors. Chi-square and generalized estimating equation ordinal logistic or linear regression, respectively, assessed prevalence of sexual behaviors or differences in sexual emotions when academic behaviors did and did not occur.

Results Young women's weekday reports of skipping school or failing a test were significantly linked to more frequent vaginal sex, less frequent condom use, and different levels of sexual emotions, on that same day.

Conclusions Our findings provide evidence that the emotional and behavioral experiences in young women's romantic/sexual relationships may impact young women's reaction to academic events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)845-847
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume55
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Keywords

  • Academic behavior
  • Romantic and sexual relationships
  • Sexual behaviors
  • Sexual emotions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Adolescent women's daily academic behaviors, sexual behaviors, and sexually related emotions'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this