Adoption of a health education intervention for family members of breast cancer patients

Paul Halverson, Glen P. Mays, Barbara K. Rimer, Caryn Lerman, Janet Audrain, Arnold D. Kaluzny

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Relatives of breast cancer patients often face substantial uncertainty and psychological stress regarding their own health risks and optimal strategies for prevention and early detection. Efficacious educational and counseling interventions are rarely evaluated for their potential adoption and use in medical practice settings. This study evaluates a health education program for first-degree relatives of breast cancer patients based on the program's potential for being adopted and used by medical practices affiliated with cancer centers. Methods: A randomized, controlled trial was implemented in four community hospital-based medical practices. After 9 months, clinical and administrative staff at each practice were given self-administered surveys. Of 90 staff members recruited to respond, useable responses were received from 60 (67%), including 13 physicians (31%), 43 nurses (98%), and four program managers (100%). Participants made self-reports of program awareness, program support, perceived program performance, likelihood of program adoption and use, and barriers to adoption. Results: A strong majority of respondents (80%) reported that all or most staff agreed with the need for the program. Perceived program performance in meeting goals was generally favorable but varied across sites and across staff types. Overall, 56% of respondents indicated that their practices were likely or highly likely to adopt the program in full. The likelihood of adoption varied substantially across sites and across program components. Conclusions: Evaluating the potential for program adoption offers insight for tailoring preventive health interventions and their implementation strategies to improve diffusion in the field of practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-198
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Education
Breast Neoplasms
Community Hospital
Health
Psychological Stress
Self Report
Uncertainty
Counseling
Randomized Controlled Trials
Nurses
Physicians
Surveys and Questionnaires
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Breast neoplasms
  • Counseling
  • Family
  • Health education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Adoption of a health education intervention for family members of breast cancer patients. / Halverson, Paul; Mays, Glen P.; Rimer, Barbara K.; Lerman, Caryn; Audrain, Janet; Kaluzny, Arnold D.

In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.01.2000, p. 189-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Halverson, Paul ; Mays, Glen P. ; Rimer, Barbara K. ; Lerman, Caryn ; Audrain, Janet ; Kaluzny, Arnold D. / Adoption of a health education intervention for family members of breast cancer patients. In: American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2000 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 189-198.
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