Advanced practice nurse outcomes 1990=2008: A systematic review

Robin Newhouse, Julie Stanik-Hutt, Kathleen M. White, Meg Johantgen, Eric B. Bass, George Zangaro, Renee F. Wilson, Lily Fountain, Donald M. Steinwachs, Lou Heindel, Jonathan P. Weiner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

352 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advanced practice registered nurses have assumed an increasing role as providers in the health care system, particularly for underserved populations. The aim of this systematic review was to answer the following question: Compared to other providers (physicians or teams without APRNs) are APRN patient outcomes of care similar? This systematic review of published literature between 1990 and 2008 on care provided by APRNs indicates patient outcomes of care provided by nurse practitioners and certified nurse midwives in collaboration with physicians are similar to and in some ways better than care provided by physicians alone for the populations and in the settings included. Use of clinical nurse specialists in acute care settings can reduce length of stay and cost of care for hospitalized patients. These results extend what is known about APRN outcomes from previous reviews by assessing all types of APRNs over a span of 18 years, using a systematic process with intentionally broad inclusion of outcomes, patient populations, and settings. The results indicate APRNs provide effective and high-quality patient care, have an important role in improving the quality of patient care in the United States, and could help to address concerns about whether care provided by APRNs can safely augment the physician supply to support reform efforts aimed at expanding access to care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)230-250
Number of pages21
JournalNursing Economics
Volume29
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Patient Care
Nurses
Physicians
Quality of Health Care
Nurse Clinicians
Nurse Midwives
Nurse Practitioners
Vulnerable Populations
Population
Length of Stay
Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Newhouse, R., Stanik-Hutt, J., White, K. M., Johantgen, M., Bass, E. B., Zangaro, G., ... Weiner, J. P. (2011). Advanced practice nurse outcomes 1990=2008: A systematic review. Nursing Economics, 29(5), 230-250.

Advanced practice nurse outcomes 1990=2008 : A systematic review. / Newhouse, Robin; Stanik-Hutt, Julie; White, Kathleen M.; Johantgen, Meg; Bass, Eric B.; Zangaro, George; Wilson, Renee F.; Fountain, Lily; Steinwachs, Donald M.; Heindel, Lou; Weiner, Jonathan P.

In: Nursing Economics, Vol. 29, No. 5, 09.2011, p. 230-250.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Newhouse, R, Stanik-Hutt, J, White, KM, Johantgen, M, Bass, EB, Zangaro, G, Wilson, RF, Fountain, L, Steinwachs, DM, Heindel, L & Weiner, JP 2011, 'Advanced practice nurse outcomes 1990=2008: A systematic review', Nursing Economics, vol. 29, no. 5, pp. 230-250.
Newhouse R, Stanik-Hutt J, White KM, Johantgen M, Bass EB, Zangaro G et al. Advanced practice nurse outcomes 1990=2008: A systematic review. Nursing Economics. 2011 Sep;29(5):230-250.
Newhouse, Robin ; Stanik-Hutt, Julie ; White, Kathleen M. ; Johantgen, Meg ; Bass, Eric B. ; Zangaro, George ; Wilson, Renee F. ; Fountain, Lily ; Steinwachs, Donald M. ; Heindel, Lou ; Weiner, Jonathan P. / Advanced practice nurse outcomes 1990=2008 : A systematic review. In: Nursing Economics. 2011 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 230-250.
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