Advances in management of carotid atherosclerosis

Marc D. Malkoff, Linda S. Williams, Jose Biller

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Carotid artery stenosis is a common and potentially treatable cause of stroke. Stroke risk is increased as the degree of carotid stenosis increases, as well as in patients with neurological symptoms referable to the stenosed carotid artery. Carotid stenosis can be quantified by ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, or conventional angiography. Medical treatment with platelet antiaggregants reduces stroke risk in some patients; other patients are best treated with carotid endarterectomy. Experimental treatments for carotid stenosis, including carotid angioplasty with or without stenting, are under investigation. We summarize the current literature and provide treatment recommendations for patients with atherosclerotic carotid artery disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-65
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Intensive Care Medicine
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Carotid Artery Diseases
Carotid Stenosis
Stroke
Carotid Endarterectomy
Magnetic Resonance Angiography
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors
Angioplasty
Carotid Arteries
Ultrasonography
Angiography
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Advances in management of carotid atherosclerosis. / Malkoff, Marc D.; Williams, Linda S.; Biller, Jose.

In: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine, Vol. 12, No. 2, 01.01.1997, p. 55-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Malkoff, Marc D. ; Williams, Linda S. ; Biller, Jose. / Advances in management of carotid atherosclerosis. In: Journal of Intensive Care Medicine. 1997 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 55-65.
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