After-hours telephone access to physicians with access to computerized medical records

Experience in an inner-city general medicine clinic

J. C. Darnell, S. L. Hiner, P. J. Neill, Joseph Mamlin, C. J. McDonald, Siu Hui, W. M. Tierney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined the effect of after-hours telephone access to physicians and physician access to computerized medical records on hospitalizations and emergency room (ER) visits in an inner-city, adult, general medicine clinic. Patients were randomly assigned to a control (C) and two study groups (S1 and S2). Patients in study groups S1 and S2 had after-hours telephone access to physicians. Computerized medical records were accessible to physicians only for callers in study group S2. During the initial 18 months of study, only 7.6% of eligible patients called the after-hours service, a rate of 6 calls/1,000 patients/month (200 calls/1,849 patients/18 months). Repeated promotion of the service was subsequently undertaken, and 19.4% of the patients used the service during the final 12 months of study, a rate of 24.1 calls/1,000 patients/month (467 calls/1,616 patients/12 months). There were no significant differences in hospitalizations or ER visits among the control and two study groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-26
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Care
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985

Fingerprint

Computerized Medical Records Systems
general medicine
study group
Telephone
telephone
physician
Medicine
Physicians
hospitalization
experience
Hospital Emergency Service
Hospitalization
promotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)

Cite this

After-hours telephone access to physicians with access to computerized medical records : Experience in an inner-city general medicine clinic. / Darnell, J. C.; Hiner, S. L.; Neill, P. J.; Mamlin, Joseph; McDonald, C. J.; Hui, Siu; Tierney, W. M.

In: Medical Care, Vol. 23, No. 1, 1985, p. 20-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Darnell, J. C. ; Hiner, S. L. ; Neill, P. J. ; Mamlin, Joseph ; McDonald, C. J. ; Hui, Siu ; Tierney, W. M. / After-hours telephone access to physicians with access to computerized medical records : Experience in an inner-city general medicine clinic. In: Medical Care. 1985 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 20-26.
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