Alcohol abuse in deceased liver donors

Impact on post-transplant outcomes

Richard Mangus, Chandrashekhar A. Kubal, Jonathan A. Fridell, Jose M. Pena, Evan M. Frost, A. Joseph Tector

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Many deceased liver donors with a history of alcohol abuse are excluded based upon medical history alone. This paper summarizes the transplant outcomes for a large number of deceased liver donors with a documented history of alcohol abuse. Methods: The records for 1478 consecutive deceased liver donors were reviewed (2001-2012). As per the United Network for Organ Sharing criteria, heavy alcohol use by an organ donor is defined as chronic intake of two or more drinks per day. Donors with a documented history of alcohol abuse were divided into three groups according to duration of abuse (<10 years, 10-24 years and 25 + years). Reperfusion biopsies are reported. Outcomes include biopsy appearance, early graft function and early and late graft survival. Results: There were 161 donors with alcohol abuse: <10 years (29%); 10-24 years (42%); and ≥25 years (29%). Risk of 90-day graft loss for these three groups was: 0%, 3% and 2%, compared to 3% for all other donors (P = 0.62). Graft survival at 1 year for donor grafts with and without alcohol abuse was 89% and 87% (P = 0.52). There was no difference in early graft function. Cox proportional hazards modelling for graft survival demonstrates no statistically significant difference in survival up to 10 years post-transplant. Conclusions: This study demonstrates successful transplantation of a large number of deceased donor liver grafts from donors with a documented history of alcohol abuse (n = 161; 11% of all grafts). These extended criteria donor allografts may, therefore, be utilized successfully with similar outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)171-175
Number of pages5
JournalLiver International
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Alcoholism
Tissue Donors
Transplants
Liver
Graft Survival
Biopsy
Reperfusion
Allografts
Transplantation
Alcohols
Survival

Keywords

  • Alcohol abuse
  • Extended criteria donors
  • Orthotopic liver transplant
  • Outcomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mangus, R., Kubal, C. A., Fridell, J. A., Pena, J. M., Frost, E. M., & Joseph Tector, A. (2015). Alcohol abuse in deceased liver donors: Impact on post-transplant outcomes. Liver International, 35(1), 171-175. https://doi.org/10.1111/liv.12484

Alcohol abuse in deceased liver donors : Impact on post-transplant outcomes. / Mangus, Richard; Kubal, Chandrashekhar A.; Fridell, Jonathan A.; Pena, Jose M.; Frost, Evan M.; Joseph Tector, A.

In: Liver International, Vol. 35, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 171-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mangus, R, Kubal, CA, Fridell, JA, Pena, JM, Frost, EM & Joseph Tector, A 2015, 'Alcohol abuse in deceased liver donors: Impact on post-transplant outcomes', Liver International, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 171-175. https://doi.org/10.1111/liv.12484
Mangus R, Kubal CA, Fridell JA, Pena JM, Frost EM, Joseph Tector A. Alcohol abuse in deceased liver donors: Impact on post-transplant outcomes. Liver International. 2015 Jan 1;35(1):171-175. https://doi.org/10.1111/liv.12484
Mangus, Richard ; Kubal, Chandrashekhar A. ; Fridell, Jonathan A. ; Pena, Jose M. ; Frost, Evan M. ; Joseph Tector, A. / Alcohol abuse in deceased liver donors : Impact on post-transplant outcomes. In: Liver International. 2015 ; Vol. 35, No. 1. pp. 171-175.
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