Alcohol and pancreatic cancer in blacks and whites in the United States

D. T. Silverman, L. M. Brown, R. N. Hoover, M. Schiffman, K. D. Lillemoe, J. B. Schoenberg, G. M. Swanson, R. B. Hayes, R. S. Greenberg, J. Benichou, A. G. Schwartz, J. M. Lift, L. M. Pottern

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Abstract

A population-based, case-control study of pancreatic cancer based on direct interviews with 307 white and 179 black incident cases and 1164 white and 945 black population controls was conducted in three areas of the United States to determine the role alcohol drinking plays as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and to estimate the extent to which it may explain the higher incidence of pancreatic cancer in blacks compared to whites. Our findings indicate that alcohol drinking at the levels typically consumed by the general population of the United States is probably not a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Our data suggest, however, that heavy alcohol drinking may be related to pancreatic cancer risk. Among men, blacks and whites who drank at least 57 drinks/week had odds ratios (ORs) of 2.2 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.9-5.6] and 1.4 (95% CI = 0.6-3.2), respectively. Among women, blacks who drank 8 to

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4899-4905
Number of pages7
JournalCancer Research
Volume55
Issue number21
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Pancreatic Neoplasms
Alcohols
Alcohol Drinking
Confidence Intervals
Population Control
Population
Case-Control Studies
Odds Ratio
hydroquinone
Interviews
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Silverman, D. T., Brown, L. M., Hoover, R. N., Schiffman, M., Lillemoe, K. D., Schoenberg, J. B., ... Pottern, L. M. (1995). Alcohol and pancreatic cancer in blacks and whites in the United States. Cancer Research, 55(21), 4899-4905.

Alcohol and pancreatic cancer in blacks and whites in the United States. / Silverman, D. T.; Brown, L. M.; Hoover, R. N.; Schiffman, M.; Lillemoe, K. D.; Schoenberg, J. B.; Swanson, G. M.; Hayes, R. B.; Greenberg, R. S.; Benichou, J.; Schwartz, A. G.; Lift, J. M.; Pottern, L. M.

In: Cancer Research, Vol. 55, No. 21, 1995, p. 4899-4905.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Silverman, DT, Brown, LM, Hoover, RN, Schiffman, M, Lillemoe, KD, Schoenberg, JB, Swanson, GM, Hayes, RB, Greenberg, RS, Benichou, J, Schwartz, AG, Lift, JM & Pottern, LM 1995, 'Alcohol and pancreatic cancer in blacks and whites in the United States', Cancer Research, vol. 55, no. 21, pp. 4899-4905.
Silverman DT, Brown LM, Hoover RN, Schiffman M, Lillemoe KD, Schoenberg JB et al. Alcohol and pancreatic cancer in blacks and whites in the United States. Cancer Research. 1995;55(21):4899-4905.
Silverman, D. T. ; Brown, L. M. ; Hoover, R. N. ; Schiffman, M. ; Lillemoe, K. D. ; Schoenberg, J. B. ; Swanson, G. M. ; Hayes, R. B. ; Greenberg, R. S. ; Benichou, J. ; Schwartz, A. G. ; Lift, J. M. ; Pottern, L. M. / Alcohol and pancreatic cancer in blacks and whites in the United States. In: Cancer Research. 1995 ; Vol. 55, No. 21. pp. 4899-4905.
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AU - Schoenberg, J. B.

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AU - Hayes, R. B.

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AU - Lift, J. M.

AU - Pottern, L. M.

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