Allergen-specific IgE levels and mite allergen exposure in children with acute asthma first seen in an emergency department and in nonasthmatic control subjects

Robert Nelson, Roberto DiNicolo, Enrique Fernández-Caldas, Mitchell J. Seleznick, Richard F. Lockey, Robert A. Good

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Sensitization to allergens has been shown to be a risk factor for adults with acute asthma first seen in the emergency department. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of specific IgE to common aeroallergens in children with asthma first seen in the emergency department and in control subjects. Methods: Fifty-four children, aged 3 to 16 years (mean age, 8.34 years) who visited the emergency department for treatment of acute bronchospasm or other illness, were evaluated. Specific IgE to seven common aeroallergens and four common storage mites was determined. Group I consisted of 29 patients who had acute bronchospasm and histories of recurrent asthma. Group II consisted of 25 control subjects who had no clinical history of atopic disease. Groups I and II were compared for differences in the prevalence of positive RAST responses to the 11 allergens tested. Dust samples were collected from 17 homes of subjects in group I and from 13 homes of subjects in group II and were analyzed for levels of Der p 1 and Der f 1. Results: Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of positive RAST results between groups I and II were found in response to: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, 89.6% versus 36% (p = 0.0001); Blattella germanica, 45.8% versus germanica, 45.8% versus 9.5% versus (p = 0.018); Alternaria tenuis, 44.8% versus 4% (p = 0.001); and the storage mites Aleuroglyphus ovatus 39.2% versus 4% (p = 0.002); Blomia topicalis, 42.8% versus 0% (p = 0.0002); Chortoglypus areuatus, 46.4% versus 0% (p = 0.0001); and Lepidoglyphus destructor, 32.1% versus 0% (p = 0.0019). Mean specific IgE levels, expressed as percent of the total counts bound, were significantly higher in group I compared with group II only in response to D. pteronyssinus, 21.9% versus 2.1% (mean percent of total counts bound) (p = 0.0001). Analysis of dust samples revealed no significant differences between the two groups, except for a higher concentration of Der f 1 in the sofas of subjects in group II. Conclusion: Sensitization to D. pteronyssinus, storage mites, and, to a lesser extent, to A. tenuis and B. germanica is associated with acute childhood that requires emergency treatment in Florida.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-263
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume98
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acaridae
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus
Mites
Allergens
Immunoglobulin E
Hospital Emergency Service
Bronchial Spasm
Emergency Treatment
Asthma
Dust
Alternaria
Dermatophagoides farinae antigen f 1

Keywords

  • Acute asthma
  • Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus
  • emergency department
  • IgE
  • storage mites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Allergen-specific IgE levels and mite allergen exposure in children with acute asthma first seen in an emergency department and in nonasthmatic control subjects. / Nelson, Robert; DiNicolo, Roberto; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Seleznick, Mitchell J.; Lockey, Richard F.; Good, Robert A.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 98, No. 2, 1996, p. 258-263.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nelson, Robert ; DiNicolo, Roberto ; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique ; Seleznick, Mitchell J. ; Lockey, Richard F. ; Good, Robert A. / Allergen-specific IgE levels and mite allergen exposure in children with acute asthma first seen in an emergency department and in nonasthmatic control subjects. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 1996 ; Vol. 98, No. 2. pp. 258-263.
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abstract = "Background: Sensitization to allergens has been shown to be a risk factor for adults with acute asthma first seen in the emergency department. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of specific IgE to common aeroallergens in children with asthma first seen in the emergency department and in control subjects. Methods: Fifty-four children, aged 3 to 16 years (mean age, 8.34 years) who visited the emergency department for treatment of acute bronchospasm or other illness, were evaluated. Specific IgE to seven common aeroallergens and four common storage mites was determined. Group I consisted of 29 patients who had acute bronchospasm and histories of recurrent asthma. Group II consisted of 25 control subjects who had no clinical history of atopic disease. Groups I and II were compared for differences in the prevalence of positive RAST responses to the 11 allergens tested. Dust samples were collected from 17 homes of subjects in group I and from 13 homes of subjects in group II and were analyzed for levels of Der p 1 and Der f 1. Results: Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of positive RAST results between groups I and II were found in response to: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, 89.6{\%} versus 36{\%} (p = 0.0001); Blattella germanica, 45.8{\%} versus germanica, 45.8{\%} versus 9.5{\%} versus (p = 0.018); Alternaria tenuis, 44.8{\%} versus 4{\%} (p = 0.001); and the storage mites Aleuroglyphus ovatus 39.2{\%} versus 4{\%} (p = 0.002); Blomia topicalis, 42.8{\%} versus 0{\%} (p = 0.0002); Chortoglypus areuatus, 46.4{\%} versus 0{\%} (p = 0.0001); and Lepidoglyphus destructor, 32.1{\%} versus 0{\%} (p = 0.0019). Mean specific IgE levels, expressed as percent of the total counts bound, were significantly higher in group I compared with group II only in response to D. pteronyssinus, 21.9{\%} versus 2.1{\%} (mean percent of total counts bound) (p = 0.0001). Analysis of dust samples revealed no significant differences between the two groups, except for a higher concentration of Der f 1 in the sofas of subjects in group II. Conclusion: Sensitization to D. pteronyssinus, storage mites, and, to a lesser extent, to A. tenuis and B. germanica is associated with acute childhood that requires emergency treatment in Florida.",
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T1 - Allergen-specific IgE levels and mite allergen exposure in children with acute asthma first seen in an emergency department and in nonasthmatic control subjects

AU - Nelson, Robert

AU - DiNicolo, Roberto

AU - Fernández-Caldas, Enrique

AU - Seleznick, Mitchell J.

AU - Lockey, Richard F.

AU - Good, Robert A.

PY - 1996

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N2 - Background: Sensitization to allergens has been shown to be a risk factor for adults with acute asthma first seen in the emergency department. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of specific IgE to common aeroallergens in children with asthma first seen in the emergency department and in control subjects. Methods: Fifty-four children, aged 3 to 16 years (mean age, 8.34 years) who visited the emergency department for treatment of acute bronchospasm or other illness, were evaluated. Specific IgE to seven common aeroallergens and four common storage mites was determined. Group I consisted of 29 patients who had acute bronchospasm and histories of recurrent asthma. Group II consisted of 25 control subjects who had no clinical history of atopic disease. Groups I and II were compared for differences in the prevalence of positive RAST responses to the 11 allergens tested. Dust samples were collected from 17 homes of subjects in group I and from 13 homes of subjects in group II and were analyzed for levels of Der p 1 and Der f 1. Results: Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of positive RAST results between groups I and II were found in response to: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, 89.6% versus 36% (p = 0.0001); Blattella germanica, 45.8% versus germanica, 45.8% versus 9.5% versus (p = 0.018); Alternaria tenuis, 44.8% versus 4% (p = 0.001); and the storage mites Aleuroglyphus ovatus 39.2% versus 4% (p = 0.002); Blomia topicalis, 42.8% versus 0% (p = 0.0002); Chortoglypus areuatus, 46.4% versus 0% (p = 0.0001); and Lepidoglyphus destructor, 32.1% versus 0% (p = 0.0019). Mean specific IgE levels, expressed as percent of the total counts bound, were significantly higher in group I compared with group II only in response to D. pteronyssinus, 21.9% versus 2.1% (mean percent of total counts bound) (p = 0.0001). Analysis of dust samples revealed no significant differences between the two groups, except for a higher concentration of Der f 1 in the sofas of subjects in group II. Conclusion: Sensitization to D. pteronyssinus, storage mites, and, to a lesser extent, to A. tenuis and B. germanica is associated with acute childhood that requires emergency treatment in Florida.

AB - Background: Sensitization to allergens has been shown to be a risk factor for adults with acute asthma first seen in the emergency department. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of specific IgE to common aeroallergens in children with asthma first seen in the emergency department and in control subjects. Methods: Fifty-four children, aged 3 to 16 years (mean age, 8.34 years) who visited the emergency department for treatment of acute bronchospasm or other illness, were evaluated. Specific IgE to seven common aeroallergens and four common storage mites was determined. Group I consisted of 29 patients who had acute bronchospasm and histories of recurrent asthma. Group II consisted of 25 control subjects who had no clinical history of atopic disease. Groups I and II were compared for differences in the prevalence of positive RAST responses to the 11 allergens tested. Dust samples were collected from 17 homes of subjects in group I and from 13 homes of subjects in group II and were analyzed for levels of Der p 1 and Der f 1. Results: Statistically significant differences in the prevalence of positive RAST results between groups I and II were found in response to: Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, 89.6% versus 36% (p = 0.0001); Blattella germanica, 45.8% versus germanica, 45.8% versus 9.5% versus (p = 0.018); Alternaria tenuis, 44.8% versus 4% (p = 0.001); and the storage mites Aleuroglyphus ovatus 39.2% versus 4% (p = 0.002); Blomia topicalis, 42.8% versus 0% (p = 0.0002); Chortoglypus areuatus, 46.4% versus 0% (p = 0.0001); and Lepidoglyphus destructor, 32.1% versus 0% (p = 0.0019). Mean specific IgE levels, expressed as percent of the total counts bound, were significantly higher in group I compared with group II only in response to D. pteronyssinus, 21.9% versus 2.1% (mean percent of total counts bound) (p = 0.0001). Analysis of dust samples revealed no significant differences between the two groups, except for a higher concentration of Der f 1 in the sofas of subjects in group II. Conclusion: Sensitization to D. pteronyssinus, storage mites, and, to a lesser extent, to A. tenuis and B. germanica is associated with acute childhood that requires emergency treatment in Florida.

KW - Acute asthma

KW - Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus

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KW - IgE

KW - storage mites

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