Alterations to maternal cortical and trabecular bone in multiparous middle-aged mice

Alex Gu, R. Sellamuthu, E. Himes, P. J. Childress, Louis Pelus, Christie Orschell, Melissa Kacena

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: During the reproductive cycle, altered calcium homeostasis is observed due to variable demand for mineral requirements. This results in increased bone resorption during the time period leading up to parturition and subsequent lactation. During lactation, women will lose 1-3% of bone mineral density per month, which is comparable to the loss experienced on an annual basis post-menopausal. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of parity on bone formation in middle-aged mice. Methods: Mice were mated and grouped by number of parity and compared with age matched nulliparous controls. Measurements were taken of femoral trabecular and cortical bone. Calcium, protein and alkaline phosphatase levels were also measured. Results: An increase in trabecular bone mineral density was observed when comparing mice that had undergone parity once to the nulliparous control. An overall decrease in trabecular bone mineral density was observed as parity increased from 1 to 5 pregnancies. No alteration was seen in cortical bone formation. No difference was observed when calcium, protein and alkaline phosphatase levels were assessed. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that number of parity has an impact on trabecular bone formation in middle-aged mice, with substantial changes in bone density seen among the parous groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)312-318
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Musculoskeletal Neuronal Interactions
Volume17
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Keywords

  • Cortical bone
  • Middle age
  • Multiparity
  • Multiple gestations
  • Trabecular bone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Physiology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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