Alzheimer disease

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Purpose of Review: This article discusses the recent advances in the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD). Recent Findings: In recent years, significant advances have been made in the fields of genetics, neuroimaging, clinical diagnosis, and staging of AD. One of the most important recent advances in AD is our ability to visualize amyloid pathology in the living human brain. The newly revised criteria for diagnosis of AD dementia embrace the use for biomarkers as supportive evidence for the underlying pathology. Guidelines for the responsible use of amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) have been developed, and the clinical and economic implications of amyloid PET imaging are actively being explored. Summary: Our improved understanding of the clinical onset, progression, neuroimaging, pathologic features, genetics, and other risk factors for AD impacts the approaches to clinical diagnosis and future therapeutic interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-434
Number of pages16
JournalCONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Volume22
Issue number2, Dementia
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Alzheimer Disease
Amyloid
Neuroimaging
Positron-Emission Tomography
Pathology
Aptitude
Biomarkers
Economics
Guidelines
Brain
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Alzheimer disease. / Apostolova, Liana G.

In: CONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology, Vol. 22, No. 2, Dementia, 01.04.2016, p. 419-434.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Apostolova, Liana G. / Alzheimer disease. In: CONTINUUM Lifelong Learning in Neurology. 2016 ; Vol. 22, No. 2, Dementia. pp. 419-434.
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