Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia in developing countries

prevalence, management, and risk factors

Raj N. Kalaria, Gladys E. Maestre, Raul Arizaga, Robert P. Friedland, Doug Galasko, Kathleen Hall, José A. Luchsinger, Adesola Ogunniyi, Elaine K. Perry, Felix Potocnik, Martin Prince, Robert Stewart, Anders Wimo, Zhen Xin Zhang, Piero Antuono

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

570 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite mortality due to communicable diseases, poverty, and human conflicts, dementia incidence is destined to increase in the developing world in tandem with the ageing population. Current data from developing countries suggest that age-adjusted dementia prevalence estimates in 65 year olds are high (≥5%) in certain Asian and Latin American countries, but consistently low (1-3%) in India and sub-Saharan Africa; Alzheimer's disease accounts for 60% whereas vascular dementia accounts for ∼30% of the prevalence. Early-onset familial forms of dementia with single-gene defects occur in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Illiteracy remains a risk factor for dementia. The APOE ε4 allele does not influence dementia progression in sub-Saharan Africans. Vascular factors, such as hypertension and type 2 diabetes, are likely to increase the burden of dementia. Use of traditional diets and medicinal plant extracts might aid prevention and treatment. Dementia costs in developing countries are estimated to be US$73 billion yearly, but care demands social protection, which seems scarce in these regions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)812-826
Number of pages15
JournalThe Lancet Neurology
Volume7
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008

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Vascular Dementia
Developing Countries
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Asian Americans
Latin America
Africa South of the Sahara
Plant Extracts
Poverty
Public Policy
Medicinal Plants
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Communicable Diseases
India
Alleles
Diet
Hypertension
Costs and Cost Analysis
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia in developing countries : prevalence, management, and risk factors. / Kalaria, Raj N.; Maestre, Gladys E.; Arizaga, Raul; Friedland, Robert P.; Galasko, Doug; Hall, Kathleen; Luchsinger, José A.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Perry, Elaine K.; Potocnik, Felix; Prince, Martin; Stewart, Robert; Wimo, Anders; Zhang, Zhen Xin; Antuono, Piero.

In: The Lancet Neurology, Vol. 7, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 812-826.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kalaria, RN, Maestre, GE, Arizaga, R, Friedland, RP, Galasko, D, Hall, K, Luchsinger, JA, Ogunniyi, A, Perry, EK, Potocnik, F, Prince, M, Stewart, R, Wimo, A, Zhang, ZX & Antuono, P 2008, 'Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia in developing countries: prevalence, management, and risk factors', The Lancet Neurology, vol. 7, no. 9, pp. 812-826. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1474-4422(08)70169-8
Kalaria, Raj N. ; Maestre, Gladys E. ; Arizaga, Raul ; Friedland, Robert P. ; Galasko, Doug ; Hall, Kathleen ; Luchsinger, José A. ; Ogunniyi, Adesola ; Perry, Elaine K. ; Potocnik, Felix ; Prince, Martin ; Stewart, Robert ; Wimo, Anders ; Zhang, Zhen Xin ; Antuono, Piero. / Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia in developing countries : prevalence, management, and risk factors. In: The Lancet Neurology. 2008 ; Vol. 7, No. 9. pp. 812-826.
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